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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Tag Archives: Judge Charles Hoskin

What Do An FBI Agent, 911 Operator, Flight Attendant, Accountant And Stage Manager Have In Common? They will all be sworn in as Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteers to give 53 kids who have endured abuse and neglect a much needed voice.

A new group of 24 CASA volunteers including a former FBI agent, 911 operator, flight attendant, homemaker, realtor, accountant, stage hand manager and teacher will take an oath to speak on behalf of  53 abused and neglected kids on Monday, Aug. 14 at 12;30 p.m. at Family Court, Courtroom 9, 601 N. Pecos Road. The volunteers will serve as a voice for 11 siblings from one family, a child who lost a sibling and young children whose parents are working through addiction and other issues.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community, who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Those who want to help abused and neglected children are invited to one of the upcoming CASA orientations, which are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas. The next CASA orientation will be held on Aug. 16 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central  Pkwy.

“When you give abused and neglected kids a CASA, you give them a voice. When you give them a voice, you give them hope. When you give them hope, you give them a future,” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan, who will administer the oath to the CASA volunteers. “I invite members of our community to become a CASA volunteer to gain the rewarding experience of giving a child a future.”

There are around 350 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for children under the supervision of the Family Court CASA Program. However, many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the remainder of the children in care. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

“CASA volunteers have a significant impact on the lives of children for whom they advocate. CASA volunteers visit with them to ensure that the children who have been abused and neglected are now in a safe and stable environment. The CASA volunteer’s role is invaluable,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Charles Hoskin.

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them. In 1980, Judge John Mendoza led the creation of the Clark County CASA Program. The CASA mission continues to be fully supported by Family Court Judges. For those interested in volunteering with CASA, monthly orientations are held on the third Wednesday of each month to provide more information about the program.

 

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Truancy Diversion Program (TDP) volunteers who commit to a school-year of weekly truancy diversion court sessions on a Clark County School District (CCSD) campus will be recognized on Friday, June 9 at 1 p.m. to be held at the Ballroom at Main Street Station 200 N. Main Street. Each of the volunteers will be given an award and the opportunity to share their experiences of helping students attain and education.

The TDP was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002. Since 2007, the program has been overseen by District Court Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the CCSD. “The volunteer Truancy Diversion Judges are playing an important role in addressing the significant issue of truancy in Clark County. They listen to the kids, hear their issues, encourage and motivate them. The volunteers help students to overcome challenges and work to succeed,” said Judge Elliott. “The attorneys and other professionals who volunteer as judges find it very rewarding to help these students get on track to graduate. I invite attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers to be part of the solution to the significant problem of truancy in our schools.”

Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

“The Truancy Diversion volunteers are making a difference by conveying the importance of school and motivating the students to graduate,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Charles Hoskin. “The challenges the TDP volunteers are addressing with the students now, improve the students’ odds for success down the line.”

Judges, attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers volunteer approximately three hours each week to and hold truancy court sessions at schools, where they meet individually with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to 80 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all Clark County schools have a TDP program.

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional or law enforcement officer and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program please call 702-455-1755. The Family Court youth programs are a great example of how the Eighth Judicial District Court is using alternative, efficient methods to address crime and ensure justice. District Court continuously works to develop innovative ideas, improve efficiency, address issues and improve access to justice.

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Scarlett & Stephanie Bagunu

A new group of CASA volunteers will take an oath to speak on behalf of abused and neglected kids on Monday, May 8 at noon, at Family Court, Courtroom 9, 601 N. Pecos Road. Approximately 3,200 children in the community are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Many of them are in foster care. They are scared, lonely and intimidated by the system that they have been thrown into, through no fault of their own. CASA volunteers bring hope and stability to these children. This new class of 19 will advocate for 40 children.

There is a big need for CASAs in Clark County. Several opportunities are upcoming for people who want to have a positive impact on the life of a child. Those who want to help abused and neglected children are invited to one of the upcoming CASA orientations at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. For more information about the program please call 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas.

“CASA volunteers have really have a significant impact on the lives of children for whom they advocate. We thank them for their commitment and invite those in our community who want to make a difference, to consider becoming a CASA.” said Presiding Family Court Judge Charles Hoskin.

There are 305 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for nearly 700 children in care, under the supervision of Family Court.   However, many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the remainder of the children in care. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, and deal with school challenges and home life.

“When children have a CASA, they have a voice. That voice helps to ensure they get the opportunities that every child deserves. When children have opportunity they have a shot at a bright future, which is good for the entire community,” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan, who will administer the oath to the CASA volunteers. “Our goal is to have a CASA for every child in foster care. I invite the community to step forward and experience the fulfillment of speaking up for a child.”

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them. In 1980, Judge John Mendoza led the creation of the Clark County CASA Program. The CASA mission continues to be fully supported by Family Court Judges. For those interested in volunteering with CASA, monthly orientations are held on the third Wednesday of each month to provide more information about the program.

 

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April is Child Abuse Prevention Month and a great time to volunteer as a CASA.

Pinwheel casa

As part of National Child Abuse Prevention Month, 300 pinwheels will be planted at Family Court to symbolize the more than 3,200 children in our community who face abuse and neglect and are receiving services under the supervision of Family Court. Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteers and those who want to help kids are invited to join the pinwheel planting at the Eighth Judicial District Family Court flagpole on April 7 from 10-11:30 a.m. at  601 N. Pecos Road. The pinwheel plant will visually depict the free spirit that kids should enjoy and encourage those who see it that they are needed as volunteers to advocate for children in foster care.

“Almost everyone loves pinwheels. They’re fun; and in this case, we hope the pinwheels will remind people of the many children who deserve to live free from abuse and neglect, and to just be kids.” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan, who oversees the CASA program. “By volunteering just a few hours a week to serve as a CASA, volunteers can make the difference of a lifetime for a child.”

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. There are currently around 325 CASA volunteers who serve as a voice for those children. The advocates represent the children in school, child and family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them. In 1980, Judge John Mendoza led the creation of the Clark County CASA Program. The CASA mission continues to be fully supported by Family judges.

“Our hope is that those passing the pinwheel display think about the children who need someone and take the step to volunteer. For each of the 300 pinwheels, there are more than 10 children who need a Court Appointed Special Advocate to volunteer to speak on their behalf,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Charles Hoskin. “CASA’s give children in foster care a very important and much needed voice.”

For those interested in volunteering with CASA, monthly orientations are held on the third Wednesday of each month to provide more information about the program. Upcoming orientations will be held at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. For more information about the program please call 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas.

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You can never be too prepared when it comes to court. Eighth Judicial District Court Rules have undergone some revisions. The impact of those revisions on the Family Division will be covered by Marshal Willick, Esq. and Michael Carman, Esq. with a discussion at the Jan. 26, noon Family Bench Bar Meeting in Courtroom 9 at Family Court, 601 N. Pecos Road. Judge Bill Henderson and Brian Blackham, Esq. will cover announcements and updates. Presiding Judge Charles J. Hoskin will provide administrative announcements. Judge Rena Hughes will make a presentation to the Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada. The meeting will wrap-up with an open forum. The next family Bench Bar meeting is scheduled for March 23 at noon.

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The first of the newly established Jack and Lulu Lehman scholarships has been awarded to help fund the education of an outstanding juvenile drug court graduate. The recipient was recently accepted to the College of Southern Nevada to study psychology. Each year, grants in the amount of $1,500 will be awarded to 10 qualified students who are graduates of the juvenile drug court program. The scholarships are intended to assist applicants with school tuition and educational fees during college, trade and/or vocational school attendance. Students who maintain a 2.5 GPA will have the opportunity to apply for a renewal of their grant each semester/term.

The Lehman Scholarship Fund has been set up by Steve Lehman and Jessica Lehman Hirsch to the honor their father, Judge Jack Lehman, who established the first drug court in Nevada in 1992. Scholarships will be awarded to graduates of the Eighth Judicial District juvenile drug court program who demonstrate an interest in furthering their education as part of their path to a better life in recovery. The Lehman Scholarship Committee members, including Nevada State Senator Michael Roberson, Clark County Commissioner Susan Brager, Jessica Lehman Hirsch, Steve Lehman, and a member of the California Community Foundation, made the award based on the youth’s demonstrated ability to overcome challenges in her life and willingness to obtain an education to enhance her opportunities in the future.

“Judge Jack Lehman was ahead of his time when he established the first adult drug court in Nevada. His legacy of investing in the hope and promise of recovery for people in this community will live on through these scholarships,” said District Court Chief Judge Elizabeth Gonzalez.

For those who would like more information on the Jack and Lulu Lehman Scholarship Fund, visit www.calfund.org or contact Marilu Guzman with the California Community Foundation at (213) 452-6260.

“By establishing the first drug court in our state, Judge Jack Lehman took an important step that has turned so many lives around,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Charles Hoskin. “This scholarship, which helps to educate young people who excel in drug court and want to better their lives, is a commendable way to honor the legacy of Judge Lehman.”

Under the direction of Judge William Voy, hearing master Margaret Pickard presides over the juvenile drug court.

“This scholarship offers reinforcement and a hand to the juvenile drug court participants who are getting their lives on the right track,” said Judge Voy. “It provides much needed educational funding, which greatly improves the odds for success for drug court participants.”

Nevada state Senator Michael Roberson and Clark County Commissioner Susan Brager will be joining Jessica Lehman Hirsch, Steve Lehman, and a staff member of the California Community Foundation, as members of the selection committee.

Specialty courts solve issues through a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement and mental health/social service/treatment professionals who work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens.

 

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Being adopted and having a forever family is a dream come true for many children in our community who have suffered abuse and neglect. Each year around Halloween, District Court Family Judge Cynthia Giuliani  transforms to a fairy godmother  to makes kids’ adoptions wishes a reality in court. On Monday, Oct. 31 from 9:30 to 11 a.m. at Family Court, 601 N. Pecos Road, in courtroom 22 the special adoption event will take place. The children are invited to come in costume and are given treats.

This is the fifth year Judge Giuliani will create the special adoptions experience around Halloween. “This is a life-changing experience for these families. Granting adoptions and making them special and memorable is the best part of my job,” said Judge Giuliani. “Seeing the happiness of the children who know they will be loved and cared for is so uplifting and hopefully inspiring for others to consider adoption or foster care.”

The District Court Family Division is involved in other special adoption events, including an annual adoption day marathon which is scheduled this year for November 17. For more information about adoption, call the Clark County Department of Family Services at 702-455-0800 or e-mail DFSAdoptions@ClarkCountyNV.gov.

“There is a significant need for caring families who will adopt, foster or even volunteer as court advocates for abused and neglected children. This adoption event is a unique way to make it special for the families and get the word out on the need,” said Family Division Presiding Judge Charles Hoskin.

 

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