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Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Tag Archives: Truancy

Chronic absence correlated to high dropout rates has long been an issue in Nevada’s public schools. A recent report shows recent improvement in Clark County graduation rates. According to the Clark County School District (CCSD), one of the key programs to combat habitual absenteeism is the Truancy Diversion Program (TDP). As the school year winds down, it is a perfect time to recognize Truancy Diversion Program volunteers who commit to a school-year of weekly truancy diversion court sessions to keep kids in school and on track to graduate. The volunteer judges/mentors will be recognized on Friday, May 18 from noon to 2 p.m. at the Social Club Ballroom at Main Street Station 200 N. Main Street. The volunteers will be given an award and the opportunity to share their experiences of helping students attain an education. The TDP volunteers see first-hand how keeping a student in school can be the difference between failure and graduation; and between a path of crime and a path of success.

District Court Judge William Voy currently oversee the TDP that was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002, and overseen by Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the Clark County School District (CCSD) for 10 years. “As a judge who hears juvenile cases, I see firsthand the importance of education and graduation. The Truancy Diversion program has proven to be an effective part of the strategy to keep students in school and on track to graduate. The volunteers are key to this much-needed program, and their work has done much to improve the path of many students,” said Judge Voy. “The Truancy Diversion Program not only benefits those students who are struggling to complete their education, but it benefits our community as a whole.”

In the 2016/2017 school-year, the TDP was in more than 80 CCSD elementary, middle schools and high schools. In the 2017/2018 school year, the TDP program plummeted to 40 participating schools, due to the ending of grant for the program from the Office of Juvenile Justice Department of Prevention Keeping Kids in School and Out of Court (OJJDP). Since the grant expired, funding has been an issue, since each school must use school funds to pay for the program.

Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. “Kids who successfully complete school have a much better chance at success in life than those who drop out,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Bryce Duckworth. “Truancy is often the first step off the path to success. The Truancy Diversion Program addresses the issue and keeps students in school and on track to graduate.”

Judges, attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers volunteer approximately three hours each week to hold truancy court sessions at schools. They promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all Clark County schools have a TDP program.

Licensed attorneys, mental health professionals or law enforcement officers who are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program should call 702-455-1755. The Family Court youth programs are a great example of how the Eighth Judicial District Court is using alternative, efficient methods to address crime and ensure justice. District Court continuously works to develop innovative ideas, improve efficiency, address issues and improve access to justice

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Truancy Diversion Program (TDP) volunteers who commit to a school-year of weekly truancy diversion court sessions on a Clark County School District (CCSD) campus will be recognized on Friday, June 9 at 1 p.m. to be held at the Ballroom at Main Street Station 200 N. Main Street. Each of the volunteers will be given an award and the opportunity to share their experiences of helping students attain and education.

The TDP was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002. Since 2007, the program has been overseen by District Court Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the CCSD. “The volunteer Truancy Diversion Judges are playing an important role in addressing the significant issue of truancy in Clark County. They listen to the kids, hear their issues, encourage and motivate them. The volunteers help students to overcome challenges and work to succeed,” said Judge Elliott. “The attorneys and other professionals who volunteer as judges find it very rewarding to help these students get on track to graduate. I invite attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers to be part of the solution to the significant problem of truancy in our schools.”

Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

“The Truancy Diversion volunteers are making a difference by conveying the importance of school and motivating the students to graduate,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Charles Hoskin. “The challenges the TDP volunteers are addressing with the students now, improve the students’ odds for success down the line.”

Judges, attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers volunteer approximately three hours each week to and hold truancy court sessions at schools, where they meet individually with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to 80 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all Clark County schools have a TDP program.

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional or law enforcement officer and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program please call 702-455-1755. The Family Court youth programs are a great example of how the Eighth Judicial District Court is using alternative, efficient methods to address crime and ensure justice. District Court continuously works to develop innovative ideas, improve efficiency, address issues and improve access to justice.

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Blue Diamond awards were presented to Truancy Diversion Program volunteer judges at a recognition event for those who are helping to keep Clark County students in school and on track to graduate. The volunteers work with the students weekly to help them transition from diamonds in the rough to brilliant young graduates.

Clark County reported over 240,000 truant children for school-year 2014-2015. Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the Clark County School District has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

The TDP was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002. Since 2007, the program has been overseen by District Court Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the CCSD.  Judges, attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers volunteer approximately three hours each week to and hold truancy court sessions at schools, where they meet individually with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to 80 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all Clark County schools have a TDP program.

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional or law enforcement officer and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program please contact DeDe Parker at: 702-321-2410.The Family Court youth programs are a great example of how the Eighth Judicial District Court is using alternative, efficient methods to address crime and ensure justice. District Court continuously works to develop innovative ideas, improve efficiencies, address issues and improve access to justice.

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The U.S. Sentencing Commission just released a new report that has some interesting information about recidivism among federal offenders. Those who do not finish high school are considered at higher risk to re-offend. This is a link to the study http://www.ussc.gov/news/press-releases-and-news-advisories/march-9-2016.

The District Court Truancy Diversion Program is working to keep kids in school and on track to graduate https://eighthjdcourt.wordpress.com/2016/02/04/join-the-movement-to-improve-graduation-rates-in-clark-county/.

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Attorneys, mental health professionals, law enforcement officers, retired teachers and other qualified applicants are invited to join the movement to improve graduation rates in Clark County. The Truancy Diversion Program (TDP) is looking to expand its successful program and needs volunteers to serve as school judges to meet with kids, guide them toward available resources and motivate the students.

The TDP was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002. Since 2007, the program has been overseen by District Court Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the Clark County School District (CCSD).

“I invite attorneys, mental health professionals, law enforcement officers and retired teachers to be part of the solution to the significant problem of truancy in our schools,” said Judge Elliott. “The volunteer judges are guiding struggling students toward solutions and motivating them to graduate so they have future opportunities for college or a career.”

Clark County reported over 240,000 truant children for school-year 2014-2015.Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

Judges, attorneys and other qualified applicants volunteer approximately two hours each week and hold truancy court sessions at schools where they meet individually with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to over 80 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all 336 Clark County schools have a TDP program. In 2014, the TDP was one of four programs in the nation to receive a $600,000 grant from the Department of Justice designed to keep kids in school and out of court.

“I encourage those in the legal profession who are looking to do something meaningful in the community to consider being a truancy diversion judge,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Charles Hoskin. “Those who have volunteered report being very gratified at the positive influence they have had on struggling youth.”

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional, law enforcement officer, retired teacher or other qualified applicant and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program, please contact DeNeese Parker at 702-321-2410 or Deneesep@gmail.com and/or Kimberly Alexander at 702-455-1755 or Alexanderk@clarkcountycourts.us.

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There are a lot of attorneys looking to bolster their reputation. At the same time, there are a lot of young people who need guidance from just such professionals to motivate them to attend school and do what it takes to be successful. The District Court Truancy Diversion Program (TDP) is a match made in heaven for these two groups. The lawyers get to do positive work and the benefit of experience and as volunteer judges; and the students get guidance from professionals that could mean the difference between a life of success and a life behind bars.

Today, Family Division Judge Jennifer Elliot kicked-off the TDP program with a meeting with the volunteer judges to exchange ideas on what works to get students to understand the importance of their education and how to address challenges as they arise. Many of the students face basic problems that seem insurmountable to them due to a lack of communications skills, resources or fear. Representatives from the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges attended to get ideas to share nationally.

The Truancy Diversion Project (TDP) aimed at improving student school attendance and success in classes currently has around 69 volunteers. A lot more are needed to meet the goal to get the program at every school. Clark County reported nearly 120,000 truant children for school-year 2013-2014.Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

Judges, attorneys and other qualified applicants volunteering approximately three hours each week to and hold truancy court sessions at schools where they meeting individually with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to 70 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all 358 Clark County schools have a TDP program. In 2014, the TDP was one of four programs in the nation to receive a $600,000 grant from the Department of Justice designed to keep kids in school and out of court.

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional or law enforcement officer and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program please contact DeDe Parker at: 702-321-2410.

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Best pro bono work ever! That’s how attorney Kristin Brewer describer serving as a volunteer judge in the Truancy Diversion Program (TDP). At a recent luncheon, Brewer and other volunteers were given awards and honored for making a difference in the lives of young people. The program is in 70 elementary, middle and high schools and recently received a grant that will enable expanding to other schools.

Clark County reported nearly 120,000 truant children for school-year 2013-2014.Those without a high school diploma, face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

Judges, attorneys and other qualified applicants are needed to volunteer approximately three hours each week to hold truancy court sessions at schools and meet individually with students and their parents; review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful.

The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all 358 Clark County schools have a TDP program. In 2014, the TDP was one of four programs in the nation to receive a $600,000 grant from the Department of Justice designed to keep kids in school and out of court.

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional or law enforcement officer and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program please contact DeDe Parker at: 702-321-2410.

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