Skip to content

eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Tag Archives: Clark County Courts

On July 1, the new fiscal year begins. The new year brings a new chief judge and presiding judges at District Court.  Judge Linda Marie Bell was elected to replace outgoing Chief Judge Elizabeth Gonzalez.  The chief judge maintains responsibility for managing the administration of the court. Judge Bell will continue to hear specialty court cases during her tenure in the chief judge post. Judge Gonzalez will return to hearing civil, business and mental health court cases.

Judge Michael Villani will take over as the criminal presiding judge from Judge Doug Herndon. Judge Jerry Wiese will take on the post as the presiding civil court judge from Judge Susan Johnson.  Presiding judges manage the business of their respective division.

On her last day as chief, Judge Gonzalez sent out a thank you to court employees. “I wanted to express my gratitude to each of you to your hard work in making our Court more accessible to the community. We have worked as a team to improve our time to disposition and access to all of our community. The work we have done as a group is a testament to each of you. The courtesy and respect shown to those who appear in our court system is something of which I am very proud. Thanks again to all for your contributions to this success,” said Judge Gonzalez. “The court administration team worked tirelessly in support of our strategic goals. Those of you who work behind the scenes in administration and the clerk’s office keep the wheels of the organization moving, without even being seen. Although we do not see you on a daily basis, know that your work is appreciated.”

Judge Gonzalez closed her email with, “It has been my honor to serve as your Chief Judge. I wish Judge Bell and her leadership the best of luck in continuing to make improvements on access to justice and time to disposition.”

During her term as chief, Judge Gonzalez established a jury services committee and put into action a plan to add active voter registration names to the Court’s Jury Master List. Judge Gonzalez implemented improvements to how minor guardianship and involuntary commitments are handled. She spearheaded logical enhancements to business practices to maximize space and proximity to enhance interface at the court with a business pod and a guardianship/probate pod. Management for homicide cases was also centralized under her leadership to improve efficiency in the management and timely disposition of such cases.

“I want to extend sincere appreciation to Judge Gonzalez for her hard work and significant accomplishments as the chief judge,” said Judge Bell. “Not only did she maintain a heavy and complex caseload, she accomplished much for the court during her tenure as chief judge.”

“I also want to thank Judge Herndon and Judge Susan Johnson for their work in the role of presiding judge. Both the Civil and Criminal divisions have made impressive progress under their leadership,” said Judge Bell.

July 1 will also usher in docket changes, and courtroom/chamber moves. A summary of those changes can be found in this related story: Change is coming to District Court https://wp.me/p1tnuA-1tQ

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

caseflow4_2_18-e1529530806515.jpg

Chief Judge Elizabeth Gonzalez issued two administrative orders that outline changes to both the civil and criminal dockets in the Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court.

NV Eighth Judicial District Court Administrative Order 10-04 AO 18-04

NV Eighth Judicial District Court Administrative Order 10-05 AO 18-05

The following courtroom/chamber moves will also take place from June 29 through

July 1:

Department 11 (Judge Elizabeth Gonzalez) will move from courtroom 10 to 3E.

Department 19 (Judge William Kephart) will move from  courtroom 3E to 16B.

Department 4 (Judge Kerry Earley) will move from courtroom 16B to 12D.

Department 16 (Judge Timothy C. Williams) will move from courtroom 12 D to 3H.

Department 15 (Judge Joe Hardy) will move from courtroom 3H to 11D.

Department 2 (Judge Richard Scotti) will move from courtroom 11D to 3B.

Department 29 (Judge David M. Jones) will move from  courtroom 3B to 15A.

Department 7 (Judge Linda Marie Bell) will move from courtroom 15A to 10.

Effective July 1, Judge Linda Marie Bell will assume the responsibilities of chief judge for the Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court. “I know that moving is disruptive; I appreciate everyone’s patience with the process,” said Judge Bell. “The moves will allow the business court judges to remain on the same floor, which has been very beneficial to the business court litigants and judges. This will also ensure that all judges handling criminal cases have Sally-port access.”  Those who have questions or concerns regarding the moves are encourage to contact Judge Bell’s office.

CourtroomList6_20_18

This is a complete list of courtrooms with the new assignments: CourtroomAssignments6_20_18

 

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 

 

Six Eighth Judicial District Court employees were honored by the bench for going above and beyond in their work to keep things running effectively and efficiently at the court. Those honored include Tatyana Ristic who was named District Court Judicial Employee of the Year; Mark Vobis, named Deputy Marshal of the Year; Brian Hernandez, named District Court Judicial Marshal of the Year; Ronald Ramsey, named Judicial Marshal of the Year; Erica Page, named District Court Administrative Employee of the Year and Karen Christensen, named Clerk of the Court Employee of the Year. The ceremony was held at an all-judges meeting on June 13.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Scamphoto

A new phone scam has surfaced that threatens to arrest victims for check fraud. A Clark County resident received a phone call from a very official sounding “Investigator Morgan” claiming to be with a generic sounding law office. The caller not only sounded official, but also knew the victim’s name, Social Security number, birthday and address. The scammer told the victim that there was a pre-trial docket set for him in Clark County Court for check fraud. The victim was told that he could stop the case immediately if he paid $1,096.

Although the victim had not used a check in years, he was frightened by the call. He held his ground though, got off the phone with the official sounding scammer and searched online to get insight. He called the court and his suspicions were verified. The call was a scam.

Different variations of this and other similar scams regularly surface in our community. Senior citizens are a favorite target of these scammers. The scam artists usually call unwitting victims and claim they have a warrant for their arrest or a warrant for a family member for skipping jury duty. They offer up a few details that appear to check out through a cursory Google search, such as the name of a judge or other official. Then the criminals get the victims to purchase a pre-paid credit card for hundreds of dollars to clear the warrant they claim they have. Within minutes, the scammers cash in on the cards and rip-off the worried victims.

Don’t fall for these scams and be aware that the court never calls on the phone to solicit money or personal information. Report the crime to law enforcement and spread the word to friends and family.

Top three things to know about warrant scams:

  1. The court never calls or e-mails people to get personal information such as their social security number. Those who receive these e-mails or call should not respond and are advised to contact the Attorney General’s office.
  2. A key red flag is the request for money. No official representatives of the court will call to solicit money for any purposes.
  3. Be wary of phone calls or emails that look like a jury summons and request important personal information, including: date of birth and social security and driver’s license numbers and threatens a fine or prison for failing to respond.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Attorney James Claflin Jr.was selected to be the family law Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada pro bono May volunteer of the month. Judge Frank Sullivan and Judge Bryce Duckworth presented the award. Award clip:  https://youtu.be/r8caUR0G-5w

A sense of gratitude is what drives James to do pro bono work. Attorney James Claflin Jr.clip:  https://youtu.be/Uyn8NVBWznY

The award was given at the Family Law Bench-Bar meeting. The meetings are held once a month to ensure attorneys have access to all the information they need to practice in the Family Division. Topics covered include recent Nevada Supreme Court rulings, new technology, court news and hot topics.

 

Tags: , , , , ,

NVSupremeCourtRuling1Oct

The Nevada Supreme Court issued a ruling today on the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department emergency motion for a stay, pending appeal, enforcement of the district court’s March 2 and March 9, 2018 orders that granted public records applications, requiring LVMPD to make public record information from 1 October available to the media. Below is a link to the Nevada Supreme Court ruling.

supreme court order1supreme court order

Tags: , , , , , ,

DSC_0310

This time of the year, a lot of people contemplate what they can do to get the year off to a good start. Those who want to help children in need, may want to consider volunteering as a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA). A CASA orientation on Jan. 17 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. will provide information on how you can have a huge impact on the life of a child.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. CASA volunteers represent the children in school, family team meetings and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them.

There are around 350 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for children under the supervision of the Family Court CASA Program. Many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the remainder of the children in care. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. In 1980, Judge John Mendoza led the creation of the Clark County CASA Program.

CASA orientations are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas.

 

Tags: , , , , , ,