Skip to content

eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Tag Archives: Judge Frank Sullivan

Professionals in academics, gaming, tech, the military an other walks of life will add richness to their lives when they take an oath as CASA volunteers on Monday, Oct. 29 at noon at Family Court, Courtroom 9, 601 N. Pecos Road.

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The volunteers speak on behalf of children in foster care who have endured abuse and neglect. The give input in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community, who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Those who want to help abused and neglected children are invited to one of the upcoming CASA orientations, which are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas. Due to the Thanksgiving holiday the next CASA orientation will be held on Nov. 14 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy.

“Children who have endured abuse and neglect are traumatized. They need stability in their life and someone to speak up for them to communicate what is in their best interest,” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan, who will administer the oath to the CASA volunteers. “CASAs bring a much needed voice stability. They give judges a picture of what’s going on with a child and they offer the children consistency.”

There are around 329 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for children under the supervision of the Family Court CASA Program. Many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the remainder of the children in care. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

“Volunteering to help these children in need is a tangible way to make a difference and have a huge impact on the life of a child,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Bryce Duckworth. “The need is big and the feeling of reward is great.”

“You’ll never do anything that will be more fulfilling than being a CASA,” said Carolyn Muscari, A 37-year CASA volunteer. “It’s the best paying job I ever had, and I never made a cent. I get paid in satisfaction. You can make a difference and it makes you feel good.”

 

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court (EJDC) has been awarded an $874,097 U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs grant for Family Treatment Drug Court inpatient treatment and housing with intensive outpatient treatment. The court applied to the Justice Department for the much needed funding that will break down to approximately $291,365 a year. The grant will cover 13 residential beds and 13 housing slots with intensive outpatient treatment each year until Sept. 30, 2021. The funding will help to meet the court goal to improve outcomes through enhanced wraparound services to reunify families, increase parent treatment engagement and retention, decrease substance abuse and improve family functioning. The surge of opioid abuse has overwhelmed child welfare systems across the county and in our community.

“This Department of Justice grant is greatly needed and appreciated. The funding will go to address the crisis-level need in the Family Treatment Drug Court for housing and wraparound services,” said District Court Chief Judge Linda Marie Bell. “Each family that achieves a successful outcome as a result of this funding will create a positive ripple effect for their children and the community.”

The District Court Family Treatment Drug Court program is a voluntary program. Parents are typically referred to the program by their Department of Family Services (DFS) case manager and/or the judge presiding over their case. Participation in the program involves either a written referral from the DFS case manager, and/or parental request to start the program.

“Every day in court, we see the toll drugs take on families. Parental addiction as a contributing factor for removal of children is a growing issue,” said Judge Frank Sullivan who presides over the Family Treatment Drug Court. “This much needed funding gives us the ability to keep families intact as parents get the treatment and services they need to recover and care for their children.”

Family Treatment Drug Court has four phases or milestones to assist the parent in working through the complex issues of their addiction and co-occurring disorders in a meaningful and manageable way. Incentives and sanctions are used to achieve success. Parents are typically required to attend court weekly in the initial stages of treatment. Drug and alcohol testing provides an accurate, timely and comprehensive assessment of substance use and treatment progress by participants. The judge is provided updates on treatment attendance and progress, drug test results, and overall case status/progress.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

DSC_0074

Scarlett & Stephanie Bagunu help put out more than 300 pinwheels at Family Court to remind people that there are more than 3,000 children in our community who need someone to speak up on their behalf.

Thirteen new CASA volunteers from all walks of life are stepping up for children who have endured abuse and neglect, and are now in foster care. The volunteers will take an oath to speak on behalf of  more than 27 kids on Monday, July 30 at noon at Family Court, Courtroom 9, 601 N. Pecos Road. The volunteers, including a lawyer, travel agent, tax specialist, music teacher, mom, event planner, county liaison, mental health professional and retirees will speak up for the young children whose parents are working through addiction and other issues.

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community, who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Those who want to help abused and neglected children are invited to one of the upcoming CASA orientations, which are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas. The next CASA orientation will be held on Aug. 15 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy.

“Our goal is to have a CASA volunteer for every child in foster care. When you give abused and neglected kids a CASA, you give them a voice. When you give them a voice, you give them hope. When you give them hope, you give them a future,” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan, who will administer the oath to the CASA volunteers. “When you volunteer as a CASA, you get more back from the kids than you give.”

There are around 350 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for children under the supervision of the Family Court CASA Program. However, many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the remainder of the children in care. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

“The CASA program and volunteers have accomplished much to stabilize the lives of countless foster children who have endured trauma in their lives,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Bryce Duckworth. “I thank the many volunteers who have stepped up to help children in need. Their commitment and willingness to speak up for kids has an enduring impact.”

In 1980, Judge John Mendoza led the creation of the Clark County CASA Program. The CASA mission continues to be fully supported by Family Court Judges. For those interested in volunteering with CASA, monthly orientations are held on the third Wednesday of each month to provide more information about the program.

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Attorney James Claflin Jr.was selected to be the family law Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada pro bono May volunteer of the month. Judge Frank Sullivan and Judge Bryce Duckworth presented the award. Award clip:  https://youtu.be/r8caUR0G-5w

A sense of gratitude is what drives James to do pro bono work. Attorney James Claflin Jr.clip:  https://youtu.be/Uyn8NVBWznY

The award was given at the Family Law Bench-Bar meeting. The meetings are held once a month to ensure attorneys have access to all the information they need to practice in the Family Division. Topics covered include recent Nevada Supreme Court rulings, new technology, court news and hot topics.

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Seventeen new CASA volunteers have opened their hearts to children who have endured abuse and neglect. The volunteers took an oath to speak on behalf of  kids. The volunteers, including a tax specialist, teacher, chiropractor, hairdresser and former foster parent will serve as a voice for the young children whose parents are working through addiction and other issues. Three CASA volunteers were also recognized for their volunteer work to help children.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community, who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Those who want to help abused and neglected children are invited to one of the upcoming CASA orientations, which are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas. The next CASA orientation will be held on May 16 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central  Pkwy.

There are around 350 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for children under the supervision of the Family Court CASA Program. However, many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the remainder of the children in care. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them.

Tags: , , , , ,

The April 5 Family Law Bench-Bar meeting at noon, will offer the latest case law updates and other important information that those practicing family law should know. The meeting will be held in courtroom 9, at 601 N. Pecos Road. Topics to be covered include, important information on records sealing, early case conferences, case law updates and a recognition portion. Bench Bar meetings are a great forum to get questions and issues addressed, network and learn the latest legislative and other changes impacting family law.

Mark your calendar now for the May 10, noon Family Law Bench-Bar meeting in courtroom 9 at Family Court.

Tags: , , , , , , ,

 

Seventeen new CASA volunteers have opened their hearts to children who have endured abuse and neglect. The volunteers will take an oath to speak on behalf of  47 kids on Monday, Feb. 12 at noon at Family Court, Courtroom 9, 601 N. Pecos Road.

The volunteers, including a retired teacher, police officer and principal, will serve as a voice for the young children whose parents are working through addiction and other issues. The volunteers also include former foster youth , foster parents, adoptive parents and a Veterans Administration social worker.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community, who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Those who want to help abused and neglected children are invited to one of the upcoming CASA orientations, which are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas. The next CASA orientation will be held on Feb. 21 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central  Pkwy.

“Our goal is to have a CASA volunteer for every child in foster care. When you give abused and neglected kids a CASA, you give them a voice. When you give them a voice, you give them hope. When you give them hope, you give them a future,” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan, who will administer the oath to the CASA volunteers. “When you volunteer as a CASA, it’s so rewarding and you get so much back.”                                      Scarlett & Stephanie Bagunu

There are around 350 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for children under the supervision of the Family Court CASA Program. However, many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the remainder of the children in care. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

“CASA volunteers help to stabilize the lives of foster children who have endured tremendous instability in their lives,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Bryce Duckworth. “I encourage those who want to add meaning to their life to consider volunteering as a CASA; and I thank those who are already volunteering for their commitment.”

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them. In 1980, Judge John Mendoza led the creation of the Clark County CASA Program. The CASA mission continues to be fully supported by Family Court Judges. For those interested in volunteering with CASA, monthly orientations are held on the third Wednesday of each month to provide more information about the program.

 

Tags: , , , ,