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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

As a court employee, I often get the question, “how do I get out of jury duty?” Those who really have a hardship can get out of serving. But those who just don’t feel like serving could be missing out on an experience that is not only interesting, but might help them navigate the law in their own lives. We might be better off using reverse psychology and telling people that only a very special, select group of people get to serve; then, everyone would want to serve. Most judges have a story about a potential juror who tried to get out of serving and then ended up really liking the experience.

At District Court, we get tours from judges and court employees from around the world including: China, Russia and the Ukraine. They don’t use juries; but, they are definitely interested in the American system of jury trials. Our justice system is respected and viewed as a model worldwide. Jury trials are one of the many rights guaranteed by the Constitution that make the United States exceptional.

Bethany Barnes with the Las Vegas Sun interviewed judges and got a sample of the excuses people use to skate out on jury duty http://lasvegassun.com/news/2014/feb/28/dog-ate-my-summons-and-other-unique-excuses-get-ou/.

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Image              Family Court is now accepting applications from attorneys interested in serving as Pro Tem Hearing Masters in Domestic Violence/TPO, Child Support/Paternity, Mental Commitment, Guardianship, Juvenile Delinquency and Dependency, Discovery and Truancy Courts.  This recruitment occurs on a regular basis to insure that trained attorneys are available to assist the Court in those roles. Anyone who is interested is required to submit an application, whether they have previously served as a Pro Tem Hearing Master or not.  Applications from interested attorneys are due on or before March 28, 2014.

            Attorneys who apply should be aware that specific training will be required of any who are selected, prior to sitting as a Pro Tem Hearing Master.  They should also be aware of opinions of the Standing Committee on Judicial Ethics and Election Practices which would affect them, including Opinions JE 99-004 and JE 04-003.

             Those who are interested in applying for the first time, or in continuing to serve as a pro tem, should contact Angelica Baltier at baltiera@clarkcountycourts.us or 455-4622 to receive an application.

            Following the due date, applications will be reviewed and selections made.  It is possible that more individuals than the number necessary will apply.  Thus, applicants will be notified whether they have been accepted and, if accepted, when their training will occur.

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Six judges were in attendance for the Dec. 10 Civil Bench Bar meeting. Recent Supreme Court decisions were a prominent topic. Lawyers who are looking to use Power Point presentations in cases were advised to look at 59703 – Watters v. State another opinion of particular interest 55817 Perez V. State http://supreme.nvcourts.gov/ . Judge Kenneth Cory will be taking on the docket from the outlying areas. A civil case reassignment to distribute Judge Cory’s civil caseload will be effective Jan. 4. The next Civil Bench Bar will be Jan. 14 at 12:05 p.m.

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The Eighth Judicial District Court Discovery Commissioner Bonnie Bulla today announced that Discovery will discontinue the practice of receiving courtesy copies of Case Conference Reports submitted by parties in cases. An electronic system has been implemented that tracks newly filed reports. “I am pleased to announce this change that will streamline processes for counsel and save time and resources,” said Commissioner Bulla. “We continue to look for ways to improve the Discovery process and maximize efficiency.”

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It’s hard to get and keep the attention of a class of fourth graders. Judge Tierra Jones and Judge Eric Johnson kept the attention of two fourth grade classes from Grant M. Bowler Elementary School in Logandale, NV and taught them some valuable lessons on the justice system when they put on a mock trial in District Court. The mini legal eagles got into their roles as judges, jurors, attorneys, witnesses and marshals in a trial to determine if legendary wizard Harry Potter was guilty of the misuse of magic. After hearing the testimony with built in hints on how courts work, the fourth grader found Potter not-guilty. The students peered into the holding cell which gave them a stark view of what happens to those who get caught in the justice system.

Two more classes from Grant M. Bowler will visit the court on Friday, Nov. 16 from 9:30 a.m. to noon.  Judge Kerry Earley in courtroom 12D  and Judge Adrianna Escobar will host the mock trials.

The mock trials are a cooperative effort between the Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court, nonprofit agency Project REAL and the school. In preparation for the student mock trials, Project REAL provides teachers lessons to convey the roles and processes of a criminal trial. The students get an immersive, real-world learning experience, with the benefit of Project Real classroom lessons to set the stage for better understanding. The students embark on their journey through the justice system with the legal terms and other information provided in the classroom sessions.

District Court Judge Doug Herndon envisioned the mock trial program. He wrote the script involving Harry Potter to provide a fun and interesting method for young students to learn about the justice system. The activities promote the importance of education, highlight potential legal careers and demonstrate the outcome of bad choices.

Project REAL, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization, was founded in 2005 by Sam Lionel and Irwin Molasky to meet the challenge of teaching K-12th grade Nevada students the importance of the law. They have taught over 160,000 Nevada students about the importance of the law with the goal of preparing them to be informed, law-abiding and participating citizens through their programs Your Day in Court, Play By the Rules, REAL Drama, and Independence & You. For more information from Project REAL, please contact Program Director Mike Kamer at mkamer@projectrealnv.org, call 702.703.6529, or visit http://projectrealnv.org.

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The Nevada Eighth Judicial District court launched the first gambling treatment diversion court (GTDC) in Nevada. Judge Cheryl Moss was appointed by Chief Judge Linda Marie Bell to preside over the gambling diversion court. The GTDC will use the best practices already in place in Clark County’s other specialty courts including: veterans court, mental health court, the OPEN program, drug court, felony DUI court, family treatment drug court,  juvenile drug court and autism court.

Nevada Revised Statutes Chapter 458A was amended in 2009 to permit a defendant to enter a gambling diversion treatment program if a criminal judge deems they are eligible in lieu of incarceration. “Nevada is a world leader in gaming, so it makes perfect sense that our state lead the way when it comes to gambling treatment diversion,” said Judge Bell. “Our specialty courts have had great success rehabilitating specialty court participants and getting them onto a productive path. I believe the time is appropriate to use the proven tools of our specialty courts for a gambling treatment diversion court.”

The gambling treatment diversion court is the first of its kind in the state and the second in the nation. The first gambling court in the nation was established in Amherst, New York by now retired Judge Mark Farrell. Judge Moss will be the first judge to preside over the Nevada gambling treatment diversion court. “I’m looking forward to taking the proven strategies of our specialty courts and applying them to those who are in the justice system as a result of their gambling addiction,” said Judge Moss. “The gambling treatment court is a natural for this community and it is truly needed.” Judge Moss has an extensive background in problem gambling having lectured nationally and locally on issues related to problem gambling and the courts. She also authored a Law Review article on gambling diversion court programs across the U.S.

The Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court specialty courts are an effective way to address root-causes that lead to recidivism. Specialty courts solve issues through a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement and mental health/social service/treatment professionals. All work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens.

 

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A chili cook-off lunch raised just over $500 for supplies to make Quilts of Valor. The Las Vegas Chapter of Quilts of Valor has presented thousands of quilts to those who have served our country, including Flights of Honor veterans and veterans who have successfully completed veterans’ court in District Court, Justice Court and the Las Vegas Municipal Court here in our community. Each quilt is lovingly crafted by volunteers to bring the veterans comfort and to let them know that their service is truly appreciated.

Clara Thomas from the District Attorney’s office was crowned the Chili Champ this year. Other winners were District Court Judge Nancy Allf and Glen O’Brien from the District Attorney’s office. He admitted his wife Susan was the real winner, since she made the chili. Clara took home the 2018 champ’s apron, a mini quilt, a Cheesecake Factory gift card and some serious bragging rights. Our other winners took home mini quilts made from Quilts of Valor fabric remnants. Big thanks to the winners and all those who made chili, and to all who joined the chili cook-off fun.

The Quilt of Valor Foundation was founded in 2003, by Blue Star mom Catherine Roberts from her sewing room. Blue Star moms are those who have a son or daughter in active service. Her son Nathanael’s deployment to Iraq served as the initial inspiration for the foundation. That has since presented thousands of quilts nationwide to those who have served our country.

Veterans’ courts are hybrid drug and mental health courts that use the drug court model to serve veterans struggling with addiction, serious mental illness and/or co-occurring disorders. They promote sobriety, recovery and stability through a coordinated response that involves cooperation and collaboration with the traditional partners found in drug and mental health courts and agencies.

The local chapter of Quilt of Valor meets the second Friday of the month at 8670 W. Cheyenne Ave. from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in room 105. Volunteers are always welcome; no quilting experience is necessary. For more information call 702-357-0377.

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A steady stream of families with 21 kids had their forever family dream come true by Judge Cynthia Giuliani dressed as a fairy godmother on Halloween.

Courts can be a scary place for young kids. Adoptions performed by a fairy godmother judge make it fun and not so scary for the children. They along with their families also get to dress up for the momentous occasion to create a fond memory that families will cherish.

Every child deserves a stable, loving family and for many children adoption is their dream. This is the sixth year Judge Giuliani created the special adoptions experience around Halloween. “There are so many children in our community who need stable, loving homes,” said Judge Giuliani. “These adoptions are a joyous occasion and a bright spot. By celebrating these adoptions in this special way we hope to touch the hearts of those who may be interested in adoption and motivate them to welcome a child into their life.”

The District Court Family Division is involved in other special adoption events, including an annual adoption day marathon which is scheduled this year for Nov.15 and will include seven Family Court judges. “Judge Giuliani is using a creative approach to spotlight a big need in our community for adoptive families,” said Family Division Presiding Judge Bryce Duckworth. “We see far too many children in our community who have endured abuse and neglect. They long for a loving and stable home in which to thrive. Our challenge is to make all their wishes come true.”

For more information about adoption, call the Clark County Department of Family Services at 702-455-0800 or e-mail DFSAdoptions@ClarkCountyNV.gov.

 

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The Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court in Las Vegas is accepting employment applications for specialty court specialist. Applications will be accepted until Nov. 9, 2018 until 5:01 p.m.

The minimum requirements include a master’s degree in behavior sciences or a related field and two years of full-time experience in the direct provision of substance abuse and/or mental health treatment services.

Applicants must possess a valid Nevada Class C driver’s license at time of appointment. Must possess a valid license or internship as LCADC, LCSW, LPC or MFT in the State of Nevada.

If interested, please CLICK HERE to visit the Clark County website to apply.

Specialty courts solve issues through a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement and mental health/social service/treatment professionals. All work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens.

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The Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court (EJDC) has been awarded an $381,551 U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) Office of Justice Programs grant for mental health court (MHC). The court applied to the Justice Department for the grant to employ an improved strategy in the MHC that focuses on justice involved adults in Clark County who are severely and persistently mentally ill; the majority of whom are also diagnosed with co-occurring disorders including substance abuse. Individuals with serious mental illness routinely have multiple contacts with local hospitals, jails, and prisons and end up costing taxpayers significant dollars as a result of their repeated contact with those institutions.

The EJDC MHC provides intensive treatment and will use the DOJ grant funding to implement an actuarial, gender-responsive criminogenic risk/need assessment to tailor the services and supervision for mental health court participants according to their needs. The grant will fund implementation of capacity analysis, training on the implementation of the Women’s Risk Needs Assessment and the adoption of cognitive-behavioral, gender-responsive programming.

“This funding provides resources to do risk/needs assessments to improve intervention strategies, case planning and resource management,” said Judge Elizabeth Gonzalez, who presides over the Mental Health Court. “Our goal is to reduce recidivism and facilitate positive outcomes for  Mental Health Court participants through data driven implementation of correctional rehabilitation and case planning.”

“The Department of Justice grant gives mental health court tools to improve the effectiveness of treatment aimed at preventing participants from revolving through the justice system,” said District Court Chief Judge Linda Marie Bell. “The Justice Department’s commitment to funding the mental health court validates the positive  results of treatment, versus a return of those with mental illness to the streets after incarceration with no help and the significant likelihood that they will re-offend.”

The Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court specialty courts are an effective way to address root-causes that lead to recidivism. The specialty courts include veterans court, mental health court, the OPEN program, drug court, felony DUI court, family treatment drug court, juvenile drug court and autism court. The court  is in the process of beginning a gambling treatment diversion court.

 

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