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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

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Six Eighth Judicial District Court employees were honored by the bench for going above and beyond in their work to keep things running effectively and efficiently at the court. Those honored include Tatyana Ristic who was named District Court Judicial Employee of the Year; Mark Vobis, named Deputy Marshal of the Year; Brian Hernandez, named District Court Judicial Marshal of the Year; Ronald Ramsey, named Judicial Marshal of the Year; Erica Page, named District Court Administrative Employee of the Year and Karen Christensen, named Clerk of the Court Employee of the Year. The ceremony was held at an all-judges meeting on June 13.

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A new phone scam has surfaced that threatens to arrest victims for check fraud. A Clark County resident received a phone call from a very official sounding “Investigator Morgan” claiming to be with a generic sounding law office. The caller not only sounded official, but also knew the victim’s name, Social Security number, birthday and address. The scammer told the victim that there was a pre-trial docket set for him in Clark County Court for check fraud. The victim was told that he could stop the case immediately if he paid $1,096.

Although the victim had not used a check in years, he was frightened by the call. He held his ground though, got off the phone with the official sounding scammer and searched online to get insight. He called the court and his suspicions were verified. The call was a scam.

Different variations of this and other similar scams regularly surface in our community. Senior citizens are a favorite target of these scammers. The scam artists usually call unwitting victims and claim they have a warrant for their arrest or a warrant for a family member for skipping jury duty. They offer up a few details that appear to check out through a cursory Google search, such as the name of a judge or other official. Then the criminals get the victims to purchase a pre-paid credit card for hundreds of dollars to clear the warrant they claim they have. Within minutes, the scammers cash in on the cards and rip-off the worried victims.

Don’t fall for these scams and be aware that the court never calls on the phone to solicit money or personal information. Report the crime to law enforcement and spread the word to friends and family.

Top three things to know about warrant scams:

  1. The court never calls or e-mails people to get personal information such as their social security number. Those who receive these e-mails or call should not respond and are advised to contact the Attorney General’s office.
  2. A key red flag is the request for money. No official representatives of the court will call to solicit money for any purposes.
  3. Be wary of phone calls or emails that look like a jury summons and request important personal information, including: date of birth and social security and driver’s license numbers and threatens a fine or prison for failing to respond.

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Chronic absence correlated to high dropout rates has long been an issue in Nevada’s public schools. A recent report shows recent improvement in Clark County graduation rates. According to the Clark County School District (CCSD), one of the key programs to combat habitual absenteeism is the Truancy Diversion Program (TDP). As the school year winds down, it is a perfect time to recognize Truancy Diversion Program volunteers who commit to a school-year of weekly truancy diversion court sessions to keep kids in school and on track to graduate. The volunteer judges/mentors will be recognized on Friday, May 18 from noon to 2 p.m. at the Social Club Ballroom at Main Street Station 200 N. Main Street. The volunteers will be given an award and the opportunity to share their experiences of helping students attain an education. The TDP volunteers see first-hand how keeping a student in school can be the difference between failure and graduation; and between a path of crime and a path of success.

District Court Judge William Voy currently oversee the TDP that was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002, and overseen by Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the Clark County School District (CCSD) for 10 years. “As a judge who hears juvenile cases, I see firsthand the importance of education and graduation. The Truancy Diversion program has proven to be an effective part of the strategy to keep students in school and on track to graduate. The volunteers are key to this much-needed program, and their work has done much to improve the path of many students,” said Judge Voy. “The Truancy Diversion Program not only benefits those students who are struggling to complete their education, but it benefits our community as a whole.”

In the 2016/2017 school-year, the TDP was in more than 80 CCSD elementary, middle schools and high schools. In the 2017/2018 school year, the TDP program plummeted to 40 participating schools, due to the ending of grant for the program from the Office of Juvenile Justice Department of Prevention Keeping Kids in School and Out of Court (OJJDP). Since the grant expired, funding has been an issue, since each school must use school funds to pay for the program.

Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. “Kids who successfully complete school have a much better chance at success in life than those who drop out,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Bryce Duckworth. “Truancy is often the first step off the path to success. The Truancy Diversion Program addresses the issue and keeps students in school and on track to graduate.”

Judges, attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers volunteer approximately three hours each week to hold truancy court sessions at schools. They promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all Clark County schools have a TDP program.

Licensed attorneys, mental health professionals or law enforcement officers who are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program should call 702-455-1755. The Family Court youth programs are a great example of how the Eighth Judicial District Court is using alternative, efficient methods to address crime and ensure justice. District Court continuously works to develop innovative ideas, improve efficiency, address issues and improve access to justice

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Goldilocks has landed in court several times on charges surrounding what appears to be her penchant for breaking into bears homes and stealing porridge. This time, a jury of her peers wasn’t charmed by her innocent smile or persuaded by her creative excuses. They found her guilty of trespassing and theft in a mock trial in Judge Linda Marquis’ courtroom at the Family Division of District Court. It was part of the Take Your Kids to Work Day events open to students who wanted to participate. Three junior judges sentenced the fairy-tale sweetheart to a one-month grounding with no electronic devices. Judge Marquis, the Public defenders Office, the District Attorney’s Office and attorneys took part in the mock trial to teach children about the justice system.

 

 

 

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NVSupremeCourtRuling1Oct

The Nevada Supreme Court issued a ruling today on the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department emergency motion for a stay, pending appeal, enforcement of the district court’s March 2 and March 9, 2018 orders that granted public records applications, requiring LVMPD to make public record information from 1 October available to the media. Below is a link to the Nevada Supreme Court ruling.

supreme court order1supreme court order

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Nevada Supreme Court Justice Michael A. Cherry and Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court Discovery Commissioner Bonnie A. Bulla, have been selected as recipients of the 2018 Liberty Bell Award. They will receive the awards on April 28 at 9:30 a.m., at the Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. 4th St., at the Las Vegas replica of the Liberty Bell at Centennial Plaza.

The Annual Liberty Bell Award, a partnership between the Clark County Law Foundation’s Let Freedom Ring Committee and the City of Las Vegas, has been recognizing and honoring outstanding citizens since 1983. The award recognizes individuals in the community who uphold the rule of law, contribute to good government within the community, stimulate a sense of civic responsibility, and encourage respect for the law in the courts.

Associate Chief Justice Michael A. Cherry has been an attorney in Nevada since 1970 and was elected to the Supreme Court in 2006. He ran unopposed for a second 6-year term in November of 2012, when he served as Chief Justice for the Nevada Supreme Court. He also served as Chief Justice in 2017. Associate Chief Justice Cherry chairs the Indigent Defense Commission that examines how the justice system deals with criminal defendants who cannot hire their own attorneys. He also chairs the Right to Counsel Legislative Commission and is the supervising justice over the Senior Justice and Judge Program.

Bonnie A. Bulla was appointed Discovery Commissioner to the Eighth Judicial District Court in January 2007. Commissioner Bulla has been an active member of the legal community including work with the American Bar Association where she served as Speaker of the Young Lawyers Division. She was a past president of the Southern Nevada Association of Women Attorneys. She has also been a member of the Nevada Trial Lawyers Association, now known as the Nevada Justice Association, the American Trial Lawyers Association and the Defense Research Institute.

Congratulations to both winners for the recognition.

The Clark County Law Foundation is dedicated to providing community service programs throughout Southern Nevada that are integrated with law-related education.

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News headlines depict a student body facing unprecedented challenges and trauma.  The Establishing Trauma Informed Schools Summit that was held April 13 offered training to Clark County School District (CCSD) and charter school personnel, staff and teachers, as well as law enforcement and court personnel to effectively handle suicide prevention, counter violence and extremism, serve as a trusted adult, recognize risk factors of those who may be suicidal and to handle the aftermath appropriately.

More than 250 attended the summit that featured speakers including:  Eighth Judicial District Court Judge William Voy,  Richard Egan, Office of Suicide Prevention, Denise Parker, Department of Family Services, Richard Egan, Office of Suicide Prevention, Cesar Lemos, Director/Department of Juvenile Justice, Jae Beasley, Federal Bureau of Investigations, and Joe Roberts, CCSD Threat Assessments.

It is recognized that trauma affects brain development, the body, behaviors, thinking, self-concept and relationships. Research indicates that one out of every four children attending school has been exposed to a traumatic event that can affect learning and/or behavior. The goal with trauma-informed schools is to help children feel safe so they can learn. The idea is that social and emotional well being have to be addressed to remove stress and facilitate the learning process.

Attendees were given information and tools including:

A first-responders’ checklist.

Children’s responses to traumatic incidences.

Development stages affect how children interpret their fear and how they experience traumatic reaction to death.

Developmental Issues of Grieving Children and How to Help.

The summit was hosted by: the Office of Suicide Prevention, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department , the Eighth Judicial District Court , the Clark County School District  and the Charter School Association of Nevada.

 

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