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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

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The Howard D. McKibben Chapter of the American Inns of Court has been awarded the Achieving Excellence Platinum designation for the 2017-2018 Inn year. The platinum designation is the highest award presented by the American Inns of Court. To be considered for platinum status, Inns must master specific areas related to the purpose of the respected legal organization including: program development, mentoring and outreach activities. A select group of chapters attain this designation each year.

The Inn  promotes civility, ethics, and professionalism through continuing legal education (CLE) programs and mentoring. Meetings in Las Vegas are held on the second Tuesday of the month between September and June. Law students and attorneys interested in applying for membership are encouraged to contact Andrew Craner at nvesq@cox.net to request an application. The deadline for submission of new member applications is August 31, 2018.

The Howard D. McKibben Chapter of the American Inn of Court was founded in 1986 and was the 24th chapter to receive a charter. The Inn is named for its founding President, the  Honorable Howard D. McKibben (Sr. Judge).

Upcoming meeting dates at Regional Justice Center (RJC) and the Lloyd D. George Courthouse (LDG)

  • Oct.  9 Social  & new member orientation (RJC)
  • Nov. 13 Federal Admission Ceremony/program  (LDG)
  • Dec. 11 Social &  community service project (RJC)
  • Feb. 12  (LDG)
  • March 12  (LDG)
  • April 9 (LDG)
  • May 14 (LDG)
  • June 11 End of Year Dinner Location TBD
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The monthly celebration to mark graduations from intensive specialty court treatment programs had 51 participants cross the finish line to start their lifelong process to be substance-abuse free. The graduations spread a positive ripple-effect through the people in their families and the community. Their families now have a loved one who is contributing instead of disrupting their lives. The community as whole will also benefit from this group of people committed to a better life. At an estimated jail cost of $135 per-day per-inmate, 51 successful graduates will save more than $2.5 million a year in incarceration costs alone. The social benefits are immeasurable from those who want to contribute to the community instead of disrupt. The graduating class includes participants from veterans’ court, mental health court, the OPEN program, drug court and felony DUI court.

Six veterans were part of the large August graduating class. They were wrapped in beautiful quilts specially made by the Quilts of Valor non-profit organization to give them comfort and remind them that their service is appreciated.

Specialty courts solve issues through a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement, court program coordinators and mental health/social service/treatment professionals. All work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens. The National Association of Drug Court Professionals reports: “nationwide, 75 percent of drug court graduates remain arrest-free at least two years after leaving the program. Drug courts reduce crime as much as 35 percent more than other sentencing options.”

The Eighth Judicial District Specialty Courts were recently awarded a grant of $1million from the Substance Abuse Prevention Treatment Agency (SAPTA) to provide sober living and residential treatment placements for individuals in the Clark County Detention Center (CCDC). The SAPTA Grant provides funding for sober living facilities and residential bed infrastructure in Clark County to reduce the average number of days jailed drug court candidates spend waiting for residential placement. Drug court participants have significantly higher rates of success in programs that offer a continuum of care for substance abuse treatment with residential treatment and sober living. That success reduces the burdens on the jail, the justice system and the community as a whole. In FY 2018, 111 participants were provided residential treatment and 189 were provided supportive sober living, with 162 participants obtaining employment.

The Quilts of Valor Foundation was founded in 2003, by Blue Star mom Catherine Roberts from her sewing room. Blue Star moms are those who have a son or daughter in active service. Her son Nathanael’s deployment to Iraq served as the initial inspiration for the foundation. That has since presented thousands of quilts nationwide to those who have served our country.

The local chapter of Quilts of Valor meets the second Friday of the month at 8670 W. Cheyenne Ave. from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in room 105. Volunteers are always welcome; no quilting experience is necessary. For more information call 702-357-0377.

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Mark your calendar for an orientation this Wednesday, Aug. 15 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. for an opportunity to achieve fulfillment an inner beauty as you step into the role of a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA). CASA volunteers speak up for children who need a voice.Those who have volunteered for the program share experiences of deep fulfillment and learning through helping children. There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court.

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

CASA orientations are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit WWW.CASALASVEGAS.ORG or Facebook at WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/#!/CASALASVEGAS. After the Aug. 15 orientation, the next CASA orientation will be held on Sept. 19 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy.

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The last civil Bench-Bar of the summer on Aug. 14 at noon, will offer attorneys some very useful information in the air-conditioned comfort of courtroom 10D. A free half-credit continuing legal education (CLE) presentation on  Addiction in the Legal Field will be presented by Kristine Kuzemka, Esq.

The latest court news will also be on the agenda including: IT director Mike Doan’s update on e-filing; the Civil Overflow Program by Judge Tierra Jones; Trial by Peers by Alexis Brown, Esq. and Patrick Montejano, executive director of the Clark County Law Foundation; and the new #CAP100 initiative by Noah Malgeri from  the Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada. Formation of a Civil Bench-Bar committee will also be discussed, along with opportunities to add the committee to your resume as a founding member. The meeting will close with a summary of Nevada Supreme Court decisions by Kelley K. Blatnik, Esq.

The Civil Bench-Bar meetings occur on the second Tuesday of each month at noon. They are a great way for attorneys to get up to the minute court news, get questions and concerns addressed by the bench, and to network while you enjoy lunch.

 

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Judge Rob Bare issued an order today denying a Clark County School District (CCSD) motion to vacate an arbitration award with the Clark County Education Association regarding teacher pay.

Link to : Judge Rob Bare’s Order Clark County School District vs. Clark County Education Association CCSDvsCCEAD

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Scarlett & Stephanie Bagunu help put out more than 300 pinwheels at Family Court to remind people that there are more than 3,000 children in our community who need someone to speak up on their behalf.

Thirteen new CASA volunteers from all walks of life are stepping up for children who have endured abuse and neglect, and are now in foster care. The volunteers will take an oath to speak on behalf of  more than 27 kids on Monday, July 30 at noon at Family Court, Courtroom 9, 601 N. Pecos Road. The volunteers, including a lawyer, travel agent, tax specialist, music teacher, mom, event planner, county liaison, mental health professional and retirees will speak up for the young children whose parents are working through addiction and other issues.

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community, who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Those who want to help abused and neglected children are invited to one of the upcoming CASA orientations, which are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas. The next CASA orientation will be held on Aug. 15 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy.

“Our goal is to have a CASA volunteer for every child in foster care. When you give abused and neglected kids a CASA, you give them a voice. When you give them a voice, you give them hope. When you give them hope, you give them a future,” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan, who will administer the oath to the CASA volunteers. “When you volunteer as a CASA, you get more back from the kids than you give.”

There are around 350 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for children under the supervision of the Family Court CASA Program. However, many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the remainder of the children in care. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

“The CASA program and volunteers have accomplished much to stabilize the lives of countless foster children who have endured trauma in their lives,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Bryce Duckworth. “I thank the many volunteers who have stepped up to help children in need. Their commitment and willingness to speak up for kids has an enduring impact.”

In 1980, Judge John Mendoza led the creation of the Clark County CASA Program. The CASA mission continues to be fully supported by Family Court Judges. For those interested in volunteering with CASA, monthly orientations are held on the third Wednesday of each month to provide more information about the program.

 

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The Eighth Judicial District Specialty Courts have been awarded a grant of $1million from the Substance Abuse Prevention Treatment Agency (SAPTA) to provide sober living and residential treatment placements for individuals in the Clark County Detention Center (CCDC). The SAPTA Grant provides funding for sober living facilities and residential bed infrastructure in Clark County to reduce the average number of days jailed drug court candidates spend waiting for residential placement. Drug court participants have significantly higher rates of success in programs that offer a continuum of care for substance abuse treatment with residential treatment and sober living. That success reduces the burdens on the jail, the justice system and the community as a whole.

In FY 2018, 111 participants were provided residential treatment and 189 were provided supportive sober living, with 162 participants obtaining employment.

In compliance with the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP) recommended adult drug court practices, individuals in need of substance abuse treatment should not be incarcerated to achieve clinical or social service objectives. Clark County has a growing need for sufficient sober living and residential placement facilities for inpatient substance abuse treatment. As a result, individuals remain in jail awaiting substance abuse treatment. The District Court estimates the annual fiscal savings that will result to Clark County at more than $4 million in averted incarceration and associated criminal justice costs.

“I am grateful to receive this grant money to provide sober living and residential treatment placements for specialty court participants,” said Chief Judge Linda Marie Bell. “This funding greatly improves the chances of success for those who are provided placements, reduces the critically overcrowded jail population, and saves millions of dollars in avoided incarceration costs.”

Specialty courts solve issues through a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement, court program coordinators and mental health/social service/treatment professionals. All work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens. The National Association of Drug Court Professionals reports: “nationwide, 75 percent of drug court graduates remain arrest-free at least two years after leaving the program. Drug courts reduce crime as much as 35 percent more than other sentencing options.”

 

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