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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

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Professionals in academics, gaming, tech, the military an other walks of life will add richness to their lives when they take an oath as CASA volunteers on Monday, Oct. 29 at noon at Family Court, Courtroom 9, 601 N. Pecos Road.

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The volunteers speak on behalf of children in foster care who have endured abuse and neglect. The give input in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community, who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Those who want to help abused and neglected children are invited to one of the upcoming CASA orientations, which are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas. Due to the Thanksgiving holiday the next CASA orientation will be held on Nov. 14 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy.

“Children who have endured abuse and neglect are traumatized. They need stability in their life and someone to speak up for them to communicate what is in their best interest,” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan, who will administer the oath to the CASA volunteers. “CASAs bring a much needed voice stability. They give judges a picture of what’s going on with a child and they offer the children consistency.”

There are around 329 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for children under the supervision of the Family Court CASA Program. Many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the remainder of the children in care. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

“Volunteering to help these children in need is a tangible way to make a difference and have a huge impact on the life of a child,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Bryce Duckworth. “The need is big and the feeling of reward is great.”

“You’ll never do anything that will be more fulfilling than being a CASA,” said Carolyn Muscari, A 37-year CASA volunteer. “It’s the best paying job I ever had, and I never made a cent. I get paid in satisfaction. You can make a difference and it makes you feel good.”

 

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Those who want to make a difference should consider volunteering to be a voice for kids as a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA).

A CASA orientation will be held Oct. 17, 6 p.m. at the Clark County Govt. Center 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community, who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. CASA volunteers represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them.

CASA orientations are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas.

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The Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court (EJDC) has been awarded an $874,097 U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs grant for Family Treatment Drug Court inpatient treatment and housing with intensive outpatient treatment. The court applied to the Justice Department for the much needed funding that will break down to approximately $291,365 a year. The grant will cover 13 residential beds and 13 housing slots with intensive outpatient treatment each year until Sept. 30, 2021. The funding will help to meet the court goal to improve outcomes through enhanced wraparound services to reunify families, increase parent treatment engagement and retention, decrease substance abuse and improve family functioning. The surge of opioid abuse has overwhelmed child welfare systems across the county and in our community.

“This Department of Justice grant is greatly needed and appreciated. The funding will go to address the crisis-level need in the Family Treatment Drug Court for housing and wraparound services,” said District Court Chief Judge Linda Marie Bell. “Each family that achieves a successful outcome as a result of this funding will create a positive ripple effect for their children and the community.”

The District Court Family Treatment Drug Court program is a voluntary program. Parents are typically referred to the program by their Department of Family Services (DFS) case manager and/or the judge presiding over their case. Participation in the program involves either a written referral from the DFS case manager, and/or parental request to start the program.

“Every day in court, we see the toll drugs take on families. Parental addiction as a contributing factor for removal of children is a growing issue,” said Judge Frank Sullivan who presides over the Family Treatment Drug Court. “This much needed funding gives us the ability to keep families intact as parents get the treatment and services they need to recover and care for their children.”

Family Treatment Drug Court has four phases or milestones to assist the parent in working through the complex issues of their addiction and co-occurring disorders in a meaningful and manageable way. Incentives and sanctions are used to achieve success. Parents are typically required to attend court weekly in the initial stages of treatment. Drug and alcohol testing provides an accurate, timely and comprehensive assessment of substance use and treatment progress by participants. The judge is provided updates on treatment attendance and progress, drug test results, and overall case status/progress.

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Don’t miss the October 9 Civil Bench Bar Meeting from noon to 1 p.m. in courtroom 10D of the Regional Justice Center for a free, frightfully good continuing legal education (CLE). The State Bar of Nevada  Office of Bar Counsel will do a half credit CLE on Governance of the Profession with speaker Daniel Hooge (CLE sign in sheet will be provided at luncheon).

Judge Nancy Allf will also demystify interpleaders.

October is Pro Bono Month and Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada will share tricks of the trade for tapping the treats that go with volunteering to take a pro bono case.

Lunch is limited to the first 60 attendee. Get there before it disappears.

Civil Bench Bar meetings offer members of the bar the latest news from District Court, a forum to get questions addressed and a chance to grab a quick bite to eat while networking.

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The 1October healing garden at 1015 S. Casino Center Blvd. in downtown Las Vegas serves as a beautiful reminder of those deeply loved and lost.

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eighthjdcourt

It’s not difficult to find tips online on how to get out of jury duty. Legal experts note there is a historic decline in the number of civil jury trials, both at the state and federal level. That’s the reason a luncheon panel comprised former jurors who served in the federal or state court in Southern Nevada was held in early September. The luncheon was a forum to learn from the former jurors how jury duty can be improved. The panel opened up to an audience of judges and attorneys about their experience of serving on a jury. The discussion and information gleaned will be included in a national Civil Jury Project study to solve the mystery of why jury trials are on the decline. The valuable information the panelists revealed at Las Vegas Jury Improvement Lunch can be viewed on the Civil Jury Project website https://civiljuryproject.law.nyu.edu/9-5-18-las-vegas-jury-improvement-lunch. Lunches conducted…

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Schools across the U.S. have been quick to detain students who break rules, even if the infraction wasn’t a crime outside the school walls. Experts now believe that response leads to an escalation of negative behavior that frequently leads to criminal activity. It makes the circumstances worse rather than better. The cycle is part of what is known as “the school to prison pipeline.”

Educational and justice professionals gathered Sept. 21 at the Valley High School theater for the Keeping Kids in School Summit to gain insight on why and how to switch strategies with students who get in trouble at school. The idea of turning  students over to the justice system when they break rules such as truancy, is being replaced by a new premise of immediate intervention that addresses the root cause of the unacceptable behavior. Hearing Master Margaret Pickard who presides over juvenile cases told a room packed with educational professionals, “there are three reasons that we detain youth: the safety of the school, the safety of the youth, or the safety of the community.”

Those in attendance at the summit heard from experts on topics including: restorative justice, de-escalating conflict in school, legal rights of youth displaced from school, creating positive connections with students, charging youth for school related behavior, early childhood education. Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court Judge William Voy who presides over juvenile cases offered insight on a panel along with Nevada Assemblyman Tyrone Thompson, Dr. Tiffany Tyler, Dr. Tammy Malich and Clark County Department of Juvenile Justice Services Director Jack Martin.

Judge Voy has been a longtime advocate of restorative justice and keeping kids engaged in school to improve performance and improve graduation rates. He presides over the Truancy Diversion Program that does just that. Judges, attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers volunteer each week to hold truancy court sessions at schools. They promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan with students and their parents. The volunteer judges review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The program is in about 40 Clark County schools. It was in twice as many schools before grant funding ran out. Now, schools have to pay $4,000 to have the TDP in their school to cover costs associated with the program.

The panel took questions from the audience. Assemblyman Tyrone Thompson told the audience to look up their legislator at leg.state.nv.us and to contact them on school issues. He also reminded everyone to ensure that their students have the Safe Voice app. Safe Voice also has a hotline and a website available 24/7.

Each of the panel members gave their closing thoughts.

https://youtu.be/kE5p7TMeb8Y