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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Monthly Archives: October 2015

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In honor of Veterans’ day, the American Legion Spirit of Freedom Post 76 will present the flags of the five major branches of the armed services (Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard) to the Eighth Judicial District veterans’ court on Monday, Nov. 2 at 2 p.m. in courtroom 3F at the Regional Justice Center, 200 Lewis Ave. A small ceremony will honor the military service of the veterans. The flags will remain on display in Presiding Specialty Court Judge Adriana Escobar’s courtroom.

Since Sept. 2012, the veterans’ treatment court has helped veterans who are facing criminal charges as a result of substance abuse. Veterans’ court is one of several Eighth Judicial District specialty courts that save millions of tax dollars by averting repeated incarcerations due to substance abuse offenses and related crimes. There are currently 32 active participants in veterans court and 48 graduates since 2012.

Veterans’ courts are hybrid drug and mental health courts that use the drug court model to serve veterans struggling with addiction, serious mental illness and/or co-occurring disorders. They promote sobriety, recovery and stability through a coordinated response that involves cooperation and collaboration with the traditional partners found in drug and mental health courts and agencies including the Veterans Administration, the Las Vegas and Henderson veterans’ centers and Choices Group.

“As Veterans’ Day approaches, we are reminded of the needs many of our troops face as they return from the battlefield. We provide treatment for those who have turned to drugs and alcohol and end up on the wrong side of the law. It is also important that we acknowledge and honor their service to our country,” said Judge Adriana Escobar who presides over the specialty courts.

Specialty courts solve issues through a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement and mental health/social service/treatment professionals. All work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens. The National Association of Drug Court Professionals reports: “nationwide, 75 percent of drug court graduates remain arrest-free at least two years after leaving the program. Drug courts reduce crime as much as 35 percent more than other sentencing options.”

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Adoption is a dream come true for many children in our community who just want a stable and loving home. District Court Family Judge Cynthia Giuliani dressed as a fairy godmother today to make adoptions for eight families a magical experience  The children came in costumes or their best clothes and enjoyed teddy bears and special treats for the experience of a lifetime.

This is the fourth year Judge Giuliani brought her fairy godmother magic for adoptions around Halloween. “We have received so much positive feedback on these special adoptions,” said Judge Giuliani. “It is a real highlight every year to make this very special occasion even more magical for families who may otherwise be intimidated by the idea of coming to court.”

The District Court Family Division is involved in other special adoption events, including an annual adoption day marathon which is scheduled this year for November 18. For more information about adoption, call the Clark County Department of Family Services at 702-455-0800 or e-mail DFSAdoptions@ClarkCountyNV.gov.

“The judges understand how important it is for children to have loving, stable families. The annual fairy godmother adoptions performed by Judge Giuliani, showcase the joy families receive when they adopt and go a long way to getting the word out,” said Family Division Presiding Judge Charles Hoskin.

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The 25th Annual Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteer Recognition Gala was an exceptional recognition event by all accounts. It was well planned, well attended and had all the elements that you could want to make volunteers feel appreciated. Many worthy people received recognition for volunteering to communicate the needs of kids in foster care. The highlight of the night however wasn’t the really good band, the food, or even the awards for the volunteers; it was the two young people who stood up in front of a huge room full of adults and shared their story of how their CASAs changed their lives and made them believe that anything was possible for them and that their future was bright. They showed without a doubt that volunteering a few hours a week can make a difference and can bring hope to a young person in need. They spoke as well as any seasoned speaker could and conveyed how much they gained from their CASA and how much they appreciated all that their CASA did for them. All of the CASA volunteers are appreciated. A few were selected to be recognized at the CASA Gala this year. It was CASA’s 25th Annual Gala and a “toast to the future.”

Thanks to these and all CASA volunteers who serve as a voice for some of our community’s most vulnerable children.

CASA Outstanding Caseworker Marlou Steele

CASA Foundation President’s Award recipient Bart Masi w/Wirtz Beverage

CASA Excellence Award Heather McCusker

Judge John J Mendoza CASA Child of Year Alexandra Lawrence

Adelson Scholarship winner Ryan Matt

CASA Outstanding Newcomers

  • Crystal Bomar
  • Alyssa Carothers
  • Kristen Cole
  • Erin Colegrove
  • Judy Colegrove
  • Janice Morton
  • Karen Rein
  • Kharisma Rodriquez

CASA Outstanding Service Award

  • Verise Campbell
  • Felicia Ceberio
  • David Desmarais
  • Ted Hartwell
  • Hilda Wagner

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them. In 1980, Judge John Mendoza led the creation of the Clark County CASA Program. The CASA mission continues to be fully supported by Family Court judges.

For those interested in volunteering with CASA, monthly orientations are held on the third Wednesday of each month to provide more information about the program. Upcoming orientations will be held at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. For more information about the program please call 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas.

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The next Civil Bench Bar Meeting of the Eighth Judicial District Court will be tomorrow at noon in courtroom 15D at the Regional Justice Center. Nevada Supreme Court Decisions from last month will be discussed and a representative from Tyler Odyssey will be on hand to take questions and talk about the latest, greatest upgrades. The committee is open to new suggestions and issues of concern to bar members. The Civil Bench Bar is designed to bring the judiciary and members of the bar together to discuss ways to improve the processing and handling of civil matters.  All members of the bar are welcome.  Lunch will be provided.

Review of Last Month’s NV Supreme Court Civil Decisions:

  1. Frazier v. Drake, 131 Nev.Ad.Op. 64 (Sept. 3, 2015)(Appeals Ct., 3-0)
  2. Tate v. State Board of Medical Examiners, 131 Nev.Ad.Op. 67 (Sept. 10, 2015)(7-0)
  3. Bergenfield v. BAC Home Loans Servicing, 131 Nev.Ad.Op. 68 (Sept. 10, 2015)(3-0)
  4. Land Baron Investments, Inc. v. Bonnie Springs Family Limited Partnership, 131 Nev.Ad.Op. 69 (Sept. 17, 2015)(3-0)
  5. In Re: Manhattan West Mechanic’s Lien Litigation, 131 Nev.Ad.Op. 70 (Sept. 24, 2015)(2-1)
  6. Tallman/Mika v. District Court, 131 Nev.Ad.Op. 71 (Sept. 24, 2015)(7-0)(2 appeals)(23-page opinion)
  7. Mardian v. Greenberg Family Trust, 131 Nev.Ad.Op. 72 (Sept. 24, 2015)(7-0)
  8. America First Federal Credit Union v. Soro, 131 Nev.Ad.Op. 73 (Sept. 24, 2015)(7-0)
  9. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company v. Hansen, 131 Nev.Ad.Op. 74 (Sept. 24, 2015)(6-0)
  10. Baxter v. Dignity Health, 131 Nev.Ad.Op. 76 (Sept. 24, 2015)(7-0)
  11. Benson v. State Engineer, 131 Nev.Ad.Op. 78 (Sept. 24, 2015)(7-0)
  12. Watson Rounds v. District Court, 131 Nev.Ad.Op. 79 (Sept. 24, 2015)(7-0)
  13. Tam v. District Court, 131 Nev.Ad.Op. 80 (Oct. 1, 2015)(7-0)
  14. Michaels v. Pentair Water Pool and Spa, 131 Nev.Ad.Op. 81 (Oct. 1, 2015)(Appeals Ct. 3-0

Discussion:

WizNet – Brandi Wendel (Court Clerk’s Office) and Mark Schwartz (Tyler Odyssey)

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eighthjdcourt

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Criminal Caseflow FINAL 9 21 2015

Two new administrative orders (15-10, 15-11) have been issued by Chief Judge David Barker that outline changes to Eighth Judicial District assignments. These changes include broadening the departments that may now be assigned conflict, recusal, DQ, or peremptory challenge cases in Probate or Guardianship from the primary judge.

  • Civil /Criminal Assignment Matrix (8/2015),
  • Criminal Case Flow Model (9/21/15), and
  • Administrative Order 15-11(9/16/15).

Effective Sept. 21, the distribution of criminal NLVJC cases for Track 2 has expanded to include Judge Togliatti. This will balance out the NLVJC 1 assignments.

Judge Israel is now hearing the Eviction / TPO appeals calendar from Judge Togliatti.

Judge Togliatti will continue hearing the Competency calendar and is added back into the NLVJC 1 rotation with Judge Walsh.

Judge Sturman continues hearing Probate.

Judge(s) Gonzalez, Earley, Allf have Probate conflicts.

Judge Steel continues hearing Guardianship.

Judge(s) Sturman, Miley, Allf have Guardianship conflicts.

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Second graders from Merryhill Elementary School approached the case of State of Nevada vs. Goldilocks as if they were seasoned justice professionals. The mini attorneys litigated the case in which the golden girl was charged with robbery, theft and trespassing before a panel of three judges, including real District Court Judge Linda Marquis. Judge Marquis sponsored the mock trial for the young legal eagles to give them a hands-on lesson on the justice system. The students clearly got the message and nailed the verdict. They found the blonde defendant guilty of trespassing and theft, but not guilty of robbery. After their efforts, the second graders, who played roles ranging from judge and attorney to journalist and jurors, were rewarded with a treat and a certificate. The attorney fees were a lot cheaper than the real lawyers they played. Give them a few years.

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There are about 3,500 children in the foster care system. They face instability, uncertainty and challenges that make it very difficult for any young person to be successful. Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA’s) are able to provide a stabilizing force in their lives. As CASA celebrates 35 years of serving the community, the push is on to get more people to volunteer. The goal is to get a volunteer to be a voice for every foster child. The volunteers get so much in return.

In 1980, Judge John Mendoza led the creation of the Clark County CASA Program. He saw a need that has continued to grow over the years. Thirty-five years later, 35 Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA’s) for youth in Foster Care have taken to the CASALasVegas Facebook page to share their personal stories of being a voice for kids in foster care and making a difference. Their stories make it clear that the volunteers end up coming out of the experience enriched and feeling that they really have made a difference.

The primary goal of CASA is to help children achieve permanence in a safe and loving home and to ensure that the children they speak for will have the opportunity for a bright future. For 35 years, the CASA program has recruited and trained volunteers to serve as a voice for children in foster care. There are many stories of success that have impacted the lives of the kids and their families. The stories posted on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/CASALasVegas provide inspiration.

There are currently around 357 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for foster children in our community. Many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the nearly 3,500 children receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Last year, more than 900 children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, and deal with school challenges and home life.

“The stories shared by the CASA volunteers show how one person can make a big difference in the life of a child,” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan. I encourage people in the community to visit the CASALasVegas Facebook page to see the satisfaction volunteers receive and to consider volunteering as a CASA.”

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports the volunteers who represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them. The CASA mission continues to be fully supported by Family Court judges.

“For 35 years, CASA has met a crucial need in our community. We thank those who have volunteered to serve as a voice for youth in foster care, and we encourage others to volunteer to help ensure a bright future for the more than 3,500 young people in need of a voice,” said Presiding Family Division Judge Charles Hoskin.

For those interested in volunteering with CASA, monthly orientations are held on the third Wednesday of each month to provide more information about the program. Upcoming orientations will be held at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. For more information about the program please call 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/CASALasVegas. Follow CASA on Twitter at

https://twitter.com/casalasvegas.

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