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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Tag Archives: Eighth Judicial District Court

District Court Judge Jack Lehman, who established the first adult drug court in Nevada, passed away Sept. 14 at the age of 89. Judge Lehman’s obituary is posted online and includes his significant accomplishments and very rich work history.  http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/rgj/obituary.aspx?page=lifestory&pid=186671056

According to his Obituary, “Jack died peacefully at St. John’s Hospital in Santa Monica, CA, surrounded by his family. His legacy is one of survival and perseverance, labor and devotion, laughter and love, and a ceaseless desire to improve the lives of those around him. Contributions in Jack’s honor can be made to the Jack and Lulu Lehman Scholarship Fund, to provide educational opportunities for graduates of the Las Vegas Juvenile Drug Court. Checks can be made payable to the California Community Foundation, specifying Jack and Lulu Lehman Scholarship Fund in the memo, to 221 S. Figueroa St. Suite 400 Los Angeles, CA 90012.”

The Lehman Scholarship Fund has been set up by Steve Lehman and Jessica Lehman Hirsch to the honor their father, Judge Jack Lehman, who established the first drug court in Nevada in 1992. Scholarships will be awarded to graduates of the Eighth Judicial District juvenile drug court program who demonstrate an interest in furthering their education as part of their path to a better life in recovery.

Judge Lehman lived a full and very productive life and he will truly be missed. Judge Jack Lehman January 27, 1928- September 14, 2017.

 

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The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ) School-Justice Partnership Summit will be held on Sept.15 from 8 a. m. to 3 p.m. at Family Court Campus/Child Haven, 701 North Pecos, Las Vegas, Red Rock Training Room – 701 Building K2. The focus of the Summit will be developing effective methods to reduce school truancy and juvenile delinquency rates in Clark County.  Effective programming for schools, school/police diversion programs, positive school climate, restorative practices, early warning systems, trauma informed classrooms and judicially led school justice partnerships will be the priorities of the day.

Truancy and school dropout are viewed as a gateway to crime and a lifetime of challenges. The Clark County  School District is the fifth largest school district in the U.S., serving more than 300,000 students at 358 schools. The district reports alarmingly high dropout and teen pregnancy rates. “Everyday we see teens in court who started out skipping school and progressively go down the path to serious crime,” said Juvenile Court Judge William Voy. “This summit is a way to discuss best-practices that work to address the growing crisis of pathways to criminal activity with our community youth.”

Those who have been working this issue in the trenches will share their knowledge including: Judge Steven Teske, Clayton County, Georgia will present proven strategies used in Georgia to reduce truancy rates and the impact on referrals to the juvenile justice system including: Kevin Bethel, Retired Deputy Police Commissioner, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, currently of Center for Children’s Law and Policy; Theresa Bohannan, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges and Kori Hamilton, Educational Specialist, National School Climate Center.

A panel discussion of Las Vegas leaders will discuss the efforts of community agencies to reduce truancy rates and juvenile court referrals with community leaders including: District Court Judge William Voy; Assemblyman Tyrone Thompson; Dr. Tammy Malich, Asst. Superintendent CCSD; Clark County Commissioner Marilyn Kirkpatrick and Clark County Commissioner Chris Giunchigliani.

The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges is the nation’s oldest judicial membership organization and focused on improving the effectiveness of our nation’s juvenile and family courts. A leader in continuing education opportunities, research, and policy development in the field of juvenile and family justice, the 2,000-member organization is unique in providing practice-based resources to jurisdictions and communities nationwide.

 

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Civil attorneys can stay cool, get updated on court news and grab lunch at the District Court Civil Bench-Bar meeting on Aug. 8 at noon in courtroom 3A at the Regional Justice Center.

Judge Jim Crockett will lead a discussion on minors’ compromises and inter-pleader actions. Judge Gloria Sturman will take on the topic of EDCR 2.22. Discovery Commissioner Bonnie Bulla will offer up important information on Discovery.  And Judge Allf will lead a discussion on possible standard protocols for electronic discovery.

Also on the agenda is a review of July Nevada Supreme Court Civil Decisions including:

Rural Telephone Co. v. Public Utilities Commission, 133 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 53 (August 3, 2017)

Peter Gardner v. Henderson Water Park, 133 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 54    (August 3, 3017)

LN Management LLC v. Green Tree Loan Servicing, 133 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 55 (August 3, 2017)

City of Sparks v. Reno Newspapers, Inc., 133 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 56 (August 3, 2017)

So. Calif. Edison v. State, Dep’t of Taxation, 133. Nev. Adv. Op. No 49

(July 27, 2017)

K&P Homes v. Christiana Trust, 133 Nev. Ad. Op. No. 51 (July 27, 2017)

Renfroe v. Lakeview Loan Serv., LLC, 133 Nev. Adv. Op. No. 50 (July 27, 2017)

So. Calif. Edison v. State, Dep’t of Taxation, 133. Nev. Adv. Op. No 49

(July 27, 2017)

If you can’t make the Aug. 8 meeting, schedule the upcoming Sept. 12 and Oct. 10 noon Civil Bench-Bar meetings that will offer special presentations and an opportunity to get the latest news that can impact your civil practice. Bench-Bar meetings are a great way to get current information about the court and to get questions or issues addressed with the bench.

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Judge Jennifer Elliot has been presiding over the dependency mothers’ drug court since 2008. It is a program that has helped to get many mothers away from the clutches of addiction and into the arms of their children. This week, three more moms graduated from the program.  That’s a handful of kids who won’t have to be in foster care; who won’t have to wonder where mom is; and who will have someone who loves them and deeply cares for them.

In front of others going through the program, Judge Elliot asked each of the graduates how they felt upon graduation. She said, “Nobody knows what the journey is going to look like when they start out, and I want others to hear how to be successful at it.” The moms graduating lit up when given the opportunity to share how they felt. One mom said, “I’m very, very happy where I am and how far I’ve come.  It’s amazing being able to be with my son, sober; to watch him grow and remember that.” Judge Elliot told each of the graduates that she was very proud of them. She also offered a word of advice to a father with one of the graduating moms, who has his own struggles. She said, “Setback doesn’t mean failure, it just means you just have to keep on keeping on.”

Judge Elliot is turning over the administration of the dependency mothers’ drug court to Judge Frank Sullivan who handles abuse and neglect cases. She told those in court that Judge Sullivan would ensure that the program would continue to be successful. Judge Sullivan responded, “No one can replace Judge Elliot.” Program participants gave Judge Elliot a giant farewell card. The judge who launched the specialty court aimed at helping moms with addiction won’t be managing the day-to-day of the program, but the legacy of what she accomplished since 2008 will carry on for generations.

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Have you worked with Mary Bacon? Maybe you have worked with someone who worked with Mary Bacon. Mary is an attorney with Spencer Fane, LLP. She is a member of the Women’s Leadership Council through United Way and was a member of Leadership Las Vegas’ Class of 2016. Mary is also the Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada June pro bono volunteer of the month. At the July 19 Civil Judges Meeting, Mary Bacon was recognized by the judges of the Eighth Judicial District Court for her volunteer work providing pro bono legal services to low income individuals in need.

Those who have worked with Mary probably know she is a special person. Since she began volunteering with Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada in 2014, she has accepted eight new pro bono cases in a range of areas, including child abuse and neglect, civil/consumer, domestic violence and divorce. As a regular volunteer with the Landlord/Tenant Ask-A-Lawyer program, she provides free consultations to pro se litigants in need of legal advice.

If you’re an attorney and you haven’t worked with Mary, you can get within six degrees of separation by volunteering to be a pro bono attorney yourself. Mary and the other lawyers who volunteer their time have shared that they find pro bono work to be very rewarding.

The Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada informed the judges: “Mary represented a domestic violence victim who suffers from a seizure disorder and who needed assistance with a divorce and support matter. The husband was represented by counsel, and Mary’s client felt bullied throughout the negotiation process when she was unrepresented. Mary accepted this case one week before the scheduled trial. The client suffered verbal abuse throughout her marriage and the parties split due to the ex-husband’s infidelity. Mary worked on the client’s case non-stop for one week, and after several failed settlement offers, Mary showed up ready to try the case. Right before the trial was supposed to start, the parties engaged in a judicially orchestrated settlement. The client received almost three times the amount she had previously considered settling for when unrepresented. After the settlement, the client hugged Mary, and told her that she is now able to start a new life with the settlement she received, and no longer felt dependent upon an abusive ex-husband.”

The Legal Aid Center reports that Mary said, “This case touched my heart because I have been fortunate enough to be mentored by strong women who are always happy to assist me and point me it the right direction, and I was so happy to be able to help another woman in such a meaningful way on International Women’s Day.”

Attorneys who would like to make a difference in the life of someone in need by doing pro bono work, can visit http://www.lacsnprobono.org to get started.

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Wildfires in Northern Nevada have reportedly caused the Nevada Legislature website to go down just when many changes impacting the courts are going into effect. The good news is that attorneys who are looking to get the top information on legislation impacting the courts can get it at the Tuesday, July 11 Civil Bench-Bar Meeting. Judge Gloria Sturman will present a summary of the changes at the July 11 Bench-Bar meeting at noon in courtroom 10D.

The June Nevada Supreme Court decisions will also be reviewed at the Bench-Bar. Attorneys are encouraged to bring up other topics or questions they may have to be addressed. The Civil Bench-Bar meetings are a great opportunities for members of the Bar Association to get important information on the courts, network and grab a bite to eat.

Upcoming Dates/Events

Business Court Bench/Bar quarterly meeting – September 26, Courtroom 3H

Criminal Judges Meeting, August 16, at 12 p.m., Courtroom 16C

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The Eighth Judicial District Court is a busy and dynamic court. Three new District Court judges have taken the bench and hit the ground running. At a June 2  investiture ceremony, District Court Judge Tierra Jones, District Court Judge Mark Bailus, and District Court Judge David M. Jones pronounced a judicial oath in front of family, friends and fellow jurists to uphold justice in our community. Judge David M. Jones was appointed by the governor a few months ago, and was already knee-deep in cases prior to the investiture. He was waiting for his new colleagues to be named, so they could all do their investitures together. All three have now taken their oath, taken the bench and gotten their feet very wet with full caseloads.

  • Judge Tierra Jones is serving in District Court Dept. 10 in Regional Justice Center courtroom 14B with a civil/criminal docket. She replaces Judge Jessie Walsh who retired.
  • Judge Mark Bailus is serving in District Court Dept. 18 in the Phoenix Bldg. 11th floor courtroom with a civil docket. He replaces Judge David Barker who retired.
  • Judge David Jones is serving in District Court Dept. 29 in Regional Justice Center courtroom 3B with a civil docket. He replaces Judge Susan Scann who passed away.

Investitures are formal ceremonies for family, friends and colleagues. Fellow jurist enter in a procession wearing their robes to convey the significance of the investiture. The ceremonies offer a glimpse into the person who will be making weighty decisions from the bench that will profoundly impact lives.

Judge Tierra Jones leaves a post as a deputy district attorney for Clark County to take the bench. She also served as a district attorney in Nye County and public defender in Clark County. Judge Jones is from  Hawthorne, Nevada. She attended University of Nevada, Reno and received her Juris Doctorate from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas William S. Boyd School of Law.

Judge Mark Bailus takes the bench after working in private practice with a focus on complex civil and criminal litigation and appeals at the law firm of Bailus Cook & Kelesis, Ltd.  Judge Bailus’ professional experience also includes a partnership in the law firm of Cherry Bailus & Kelesis, serving as general counsel for Nevada Beverage Company and as an attorney with the Clark County Special Public Defender’s Office.  Further, he was on the Ombudsperson Panel to represent the deceased family and public at the Police Fatality Public Fact-Finding Review hearings. Judge Bailus is a graduate of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and received his Juris Doctor from Pepperdine University School of Law.

Judge David Jones is a Las Vegas native and Valley High School graduate. He attended Arizona State University. After graduation, Judge Jones taught Government, World and U.S. History at Rancho High School. After several years as a teacher, Judge Jones attended University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law, graduating with honors. Judge Jones’ professional experience includes a long-term partnership at Rawlings, Olson, Cannon, et al., and a partnership at the law firm of Lewis Brisbois. He was also the managing attorney for the Plaintiff based firm of David Allen & Associates. His work includes presiding over short-trials, mediation and arbitration, and the Truancy Diversion Program.

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