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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Tag Archives: Eighth Judicial District Court

The Medical Dental Malpractice Status Check Calendar, more commonly known as Med Mal Sweeps, will be held on Monday, Feb. 5 at 1 p.m. at the Regional Justice Center, 200 Lewis Ave. in Courtroom 14A. If the trial department has been set, or your trial had already been set, re-set, or vacated in a previous Med Mal Sweeps, you don’t need to attend the Feb. 5 sweeps and must instead coordinate with your respective trial judge.

The Med Mal Sweeps calendar will be heard in numerical case number order with the oldest case being heard first, as follows:

All med mal cases never set for trial, whose complaints were filed up to December 5, 2017 if a joint case conference report (JCCR) has been filed.

We will post a list of cases on the Clark County and Nevada State websites, once the calendar is finalized. The discovery commissioner won’t be present to address discovery issues, because only trial-ready cases whose trial schedule order has been established by the latest JCCR or SCHO (Scheduling Order) will be heard.

The court will work to enforce NRS 41.A.061.1, and will attempt to set all Chapter 41A Professional Negligence trials (not already scheduled) within three years of the date that the Complaint was filed. Please bring a list of all the cases at which you will be appearing to the hearing. Those who may have questions regarding the calendar can contact Tatyana Ristic at (702) 671-3633.

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Michael Kagan was recognized by the District Court bench as the Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada Pro Bono Volunteer of the Month for January. Judge Joanna Kishner presented the award to Michael who serves the UNLV Immigration Clinic director.

The Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada provided the below nomination information:

“Michael directs the Immigration Clinic at UNLV and teaches administrative law, professional responsibility, international human rights and immigration law. Before taking the position at UNLV, he worked in the Middle East for 10 years developing legal aid programs for refugees from Sudan, Iraq Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea. During his first year out of law school, he started a program in a loft above an Anglican Church in Cairo, Egypt where were trained educated Sudanese refugees to help other Sudanese refugees to prepare their cases for refugee protection and resettlement.

Under his direction, the Immigration Clinic trains student attorneys to represent people in complex deportation cases, innovates new ways to offer legal advice and representation to underserved people in immigration proceedings, and seeks to be a catalyst to expand legal services for the most at-risk indigent immigrants in Nevada. He also consults with the Clark County Public Defender on immigration considerations for non-citizen defendants in criminal cases.

When we asked Michael why he does pro bono work, he responded, “At the Immigration Clinic, all of our work is pro bono. I’ve been a client of free legal services at points in my life when I would have had trouble affording it. I just think access to justice is a right, no matter how much money people have.” remembers a Sudanese refugee he represented who was able to escape from Egypt.  The day before his client got on the plane, his client gave him a hug and said, “You’ve given my children a better life.” This was one of the most powerful things anyone has ever told him as a thank you.

For his commitment to representing clients with immigration issues, we honor Michael Kagan as the January Pro Bono Volunteer of the Month.”

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Settlement conferences have proven to be an effective way to resolve cases, and save time and resources for the court and involved parties. Judge Jerry Wiese has resumed the responsibility to handle settlement conferences for the District Court. “My staff and I in department 30 are excited for the opportunity to resume handling of the Overflow Settlement Conference Program,” said Judge Wiese. “I would like to convey my thanks to Judge Richard Scotti for all of his help in handling the program for the past year.”

Requests to schedule a settlement conference through the Judicial Settlement Conference Program, should be directed to Tatyana Ristic at 702-671-3633 or ristict@clarkcountycourts.us in department 30. There are immediate openings available to schedule Judicial Settlement Conferences. Those who have an upcoming trial date and want to try a Settlement Conference prior to trial, should contact department 30 in District Court.

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At the December Civil Bench Bar, judicial law clerks/former law clerks shared some insider tips on how to improve court filings.

Judicial law clerks work closely with judges, provide assistance and research issues before the judge. They help judges wade through and manage the mountains of filings that come into a department and know first-hand what makes a good filing and where filings fall short. A panel of judicial law clerks including: Josephine Groh, Collin Jayne, Travis Chance and Daven Cameron compiled their Top Ten Things Judicial Law Clerks Want You to Know.

Late filings are high on the list of things law clerks advise against. The law clerks acknowledge that deadlines creep up and there is a lot going on; but, lawyers should know that judges brief in advance, sometimes as much as a week before a hearing. Filing the day before a hearing doesn’t allow adequate time to review content and generally doesn’t go over well. One former law clerk called late filings “incredibly burdensome.”

Law clerks advise that Order Shortening Time requests should be used very sparingly. There are guidelines that should be referenced. Presently, they are overused and bog down calendars.  If it is a Despositive Motion and you’re asking for an Order Shortening Time, allow enough time for both sides to brief.

Good introductions are well appreciated by law clerks. A good introduction paragraph saves judicial departments time and are likely to result in better outcomes for those filing. A good introduction paragraph should clearly state what you are asking for and the arguments and essentially serve as a road-map for what the petitioner is seeking.

Good conclusions also get high marks from law clerks. Conclusions should be solid and summarize what type of relief the petitioner seeks in a clear and concise manner.  Don’t leave it up to the judge to guess.

When it comes to courtesy copies, law clerks suggest that is wise to know what the department preferences are and follow that. Each department’s preferences can be found on the court website.

Law clerks advise to stay up on department reassignments. If a case has been reassigned, it should be reflected in your filings. Those who reference the wrong department in filings risk losing credibility.

When a judge requires something  it is best to comply rather than use the argument: you’re the only department that requires this. It’s generally safe to say, this argument doesn’t help your case. Judicial preferences are on the website http://www.clarkcountycourts.us/departments/judicial/civil-criminal-divison/

Know what a department expects for trial exhibits, before trial. Know in advance what is needed and how exhibits should be presented. When in doubt, contact the court clerk in enough time to be ready for trial. Be sure to redact all personal identifying information that should not be made public including: social security numbers, bank account numbers, etc. Tabbed exhibit are especially well liked.

Proper punctuation is a good thing. Avoid overusing explanation points, bold text and italics. These overused formats don’t make your case more persuasive and may in fact negatively impact the perception of your work. Avoid personal attacks to opposing counsel. Such attacks are viewed unfavorably.

When writing a complaint, be concise and clear. Check templates to ensure they reflect changes in the law.

Some bonus topics were also covered by the law clerks. They advised that Motions in Limine are overused and frequently used improperly. They get a lot of requests to make the other side “follow the law.” Such requests are inappropriate and considered to waste time. A judge reminded those at the bench-bar that attorneys should follow EDCR 2.47 B . The rule requires that counsel personally confer on the issues, what can be resolved and what cannot, and the reasons therefore. If the rule isn’t followed and detailed in a declaration, some judges will vacate motions in limine.

The law clerks also reminded those at the bench-bar to be cognizant when speaking to law clerks that your communication is appropriate. Law clerks work on behalf of judges. Be careful not to engage in ex parte communication when speaking to a law clerk.

A presentation from the Nevada State Bar Association updated attendees on changes with continuing Legal Education (CLE). The Nevada Bar website has a complete list of changes that attorneys can review to ensure that they are compliant with CLE requirements.

Some important dates from the Nevada State Bar Association on  continuing Legal Education (CLE):

1/15/18 CLE Board will notify attorneys that have yet to comply with the

Credit requirement for 2017 and provisionally assess a $100

Extension fee

2/15/18 Deadline to report credits (extended) and pay fees

On or about

3/1/18 CLE Board issues Notice of Noncompliance and assesses late fee

4/1/18Deadline to submit credits (late) and/or pay fees to avoid suspension

4/2/18 Non-compliant attorneys will be administratively CLE suspended

The January 9 Civil Bench Bar meeting at noon in courtroom 10D will include more valuable information for those practicing civil law and an open forum for questions and discussion. The meeting will also include chili cook-off.

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After 22 weeks of tough training, class 2017-02 of new graduates from the Southern Desert Regional Police Academy suited up for graduation in December. The guest speaker, City of Henderson Police Department Chief LaTesha Watson gave the new graduates a lot to think about including: “Never get complacent. Remember your training. Never quit. When you feel like quitting, think about why you started in the beginning. Most important – family comes first. Behind every strong police officer is an even stronger family who stands with them supports them through it all and loves them with all their heart. Family has been key in my success rising to the top.”  https://youtu.be/TAJ7tmy7EE

Raymundo Enriquez who just successfully completed the police academy was among the graduates listening to Chief Watson’s words with classmates. Chief Watson’s words probably rang true for Raymundo. He comes from a family of law enforcement professionals.  When his name was called, he had the honor of having his father pin his District Court marshal badge to his uniform. It is an honor reserved for law enforcement professionals https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zBHDzi4ase0\. Just six months earlier, Marshal Raymundo’s father Lt. Ray Enriquez Sr. retired from the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department. “It’s a great opportunity for him,” said Lt. Ray Enriquez. ”Law enforcement runs in the family so he is going to carry on law enforcement for another generation.”

District Court is looking to recruit others who would like to serve as a marshal. Military veterans are encouraged to consider joining the marshal force. The court is working with the Las Vegas Urban League, Nevada Partners, the Nevada Department of Employment Training and Rehabilitation and the College of Southern Nevada to sponsor military veterans for the Criminal Justice Academy P.O.S.T. certification. Those interested in applying should complete a bailiff/deputy marshal application from the county website employment section HTTP://WWW.CLARKCOUNTYNV.GOV/DEPTS/HUMAN_RESOURCES/PAGES/EMPLOYMENTOPPORTUNITIES.ASPX.

 

The guest speaker, City of Henderson Police Department Chief LaTesha Watson gave the new graduates a lot to think about https://youtu.be/TAJ7tmy7EEQ

Chief Watson’s words probably rang true for Raymundo. He comes from a family of law enforcement professionals.  When his name was called, he had the honor of having his father pin his District Court Marshal badge to his uniform.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zBHDzi4ase0\

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The District Court Civil Division is closing out the year with a fun and enlightening Civil Bench-Bar meeting on Dec. 12 at noon in courtroom 10D. The meeting will give those a jump on 2018 with information on Rule 16.1. Discovery Commissioner Bonnie Bulla will share why 16.1 is alive and well. The Continuing Legal Education board will offer a heads-up on CLE changes. The civil law clerks have teamed up to provide an insiders’ perspective of the top 10 tips civil attorneys will want to know. An ugly sweater contest will cap off the lunch meeting that offers those in civil practice an opportunity to get their questions and concerns addressed by the District Court bench.

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Haul out your ugliest holiday sweater for the ugly sweater contest.

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A chili cook-off at the Regional Justice Center raised more than $700. for Quilts of Valor. A check was presented to the Nevada state coordinator for the Quilt of Valor Foundation, Victoria Colburn Hall at a recent Veteran’ Court graduation ceremony. Judge Linda Bell presides over the Veteran’ Court program.

Veterans’ courts are hybrid drug and mental health courts that use the drug court model to serve veterans struggling with addiction, serious mental illness and/or co-occurring disorders. They promote sobriety, recovery and stability through a coordinated response that involves cooperation and collaboration with the traditional partners found in drug and mental health courts and agencies.

Quilts of Valor presents Veterans Court graduates a Quilt of Valor a quilt to comfort them as they build their new lives. Victoria is a Blue Star mom; her son spent 24 year in the Marine Corp assault unit. She awarded two vets at the chili cook-off  Quilts of Valor for their service and gave a brief overview of the foundation.

The cook-off was planned to mark Veterans’ Day. The Quilt of Valor Foundation was founded in 2003, by Blue Star mom Catherine Roberts from her sewing room. Blue Star moms are those who have a son or daughter in active service. Her son Nathanael’s deployment to Iraq served as the initial inspiration for the foundation. That has since presented thousands of quilts nationwide to those who have served our country.

The local chapter of Quilt of Valor meets the second Friday of the month at 8670 W. Cheyenne Ave. from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in room 105. Volunteers are always welcome; no quilting experience is necessary. For more information call 702-357-0377.

 

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