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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Tag Archives: Las Vegas FAmily Court

Goldilocks has landed in court several times on charges surrounding what appears to be her penchant for breaking into bears homes and stealing porridge. This time, a jury of her peers wasn’t charmed by her innocent smile or persuaded by her creative excuses. They found her guilty of trespassing and theft in a mock trial in Judge Linda Marquis’ courtroom at the Family Division of District Court. It was part of the Take Your Kids to Work Day events open to students who wanted to participate. Three junior judges sentenced the fairy-tale sweetheart to a one-month grounding with no electronic devices. Judge Marquis, the Public defenders Office, the District Attorney’s Office and attorneys took part in the mock trial to teach children about the justice system.

 

 

 

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Judge Bryce Duckworth will take on the role to preside over the Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division, effective January 1. Judge Duckworth will take over for Judge Charles Hoskin, who has served as the presiding judge of the Family Division for two terms.

“I appreciate the work that Judge Hoskin has done while presiding over the Family Division,” said Judge Duckworth. “In taking on this role of presiding judge, I will continue to work diligently to facilitate the important work of the Family Division to provide families and individuals a means to address difficult circumstances, heal and find closure.”

Judge Bryce Duckworth was elected in 2008. Prior to taking the bench in January 2009, Judge Duckworth practiced law with Dickerson, Dickerson, Lieberman & Consul (later known as Dickerson, Dickerson, Consul & Pocker), practicing primarily in the area of family law. He worked as an associate attorney and later became a shareholder at Dickerson, Dickerson, Consul & Pocker. In 2004, he joined the law firm of Smith, Larsen & Wixom, where he managed their family law department. Judge Duckworth is from Salt Lake City, Utah and attended the S.J. Quinney School of Law at the University of Utah. While at the S.J. Quinney School of Law, he was honored as a William H. Leary Scholar. He also served as a member of the Utah Law Review.

“I look forward to working with Judge Duckworth as the presiding Family division Judge. He is very well respected and I anticipate he will bring good ideas and positive energy to the role,” said District Court Chief Judge Elizabeth Gonzalez. “I  also want to thank Judge Hoskin for his service presiding over the Family Division for two terms.”

Judge Duckworth is a member of the Clark County Bar Association, the State Bar of Nevada, and the Family Law Section of the State Bar of Nevada. On December 7, Judge Duckworth was awarded the Heroes of Justice Award 2017, “for his integrity, honesty, courage and dedication to the administration of justice.” In 2016, he was appointed to serve on the State of Nevada Standing Committee on Judicial Ethics and continues to serve on the committee.

He served as the Chair of the Family Law Executive Council for the Family Law Section of the State Bar of Nevada from March 2007 until March 2009. Judge Duckworth also served as a member of the Judicial Council of the State of Nevada and the Certified Court Interpreters Advisory Committee.

Judge Hoskin turns over the post of presiding judge after serving four years. He has served on the bench since 2009. He will return to presiding over a full docket of family related cases.

 

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An army of volunteers descended on Cashman Center on Nov. 14 to provide services to thousands of Valley homeless at Project Homeless Connect. The Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division set up a court on-site. Judge Linda Marquis set sixty-day hearings and quashed warrants for 28 cases with homeless parents who had fallen behind on child-support payments and needed time to get their finances in order. The court Information Technology Division created automated Orders specific to Project Homeless Connect and set up the makeshift courtroom at Cashman.

“This event was a big undertaking. Although it was District Court’s first year participating in this annual event, we made a huge impact,” said District Court Judge Linda Marquis, who presided over the hearings at the event. “I am proud of the District Court team that set up and supported the infrastructure that enabled us to hand litigants signed, file-stamped orders that quashed warrants and set return dates. The signed orders served as proof the litigants’ warrants had been quashed.  Those Orders enabled them to qualify for services from providers on-site.“

“Having a warrant is a roadblock to getting a job, finding a place to live or accomplishing other basics that help people live productive lives,” said Judge Charles Hoskin, who presides over the Family Division. “Judge Marquis spearheaded District Court participation in Project Homeless Connect to help give homeless parents an opportunity to turn things around. Judge Marquis’ work and commitment on this event are appreciated.”

Project Homeless Connect (PHC) is an annual service and resource event for those experiencing homelessness or those who are at-risk of becoming homeless. The intent is to bring needed services in one, easily accessed location to help individuals overcome barriers to housing and self–sufficiency.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Being adopted and having a forever family is a dream come true for many children in our community who have suffered abuse and neglect. Each year around Halloween, District Court Family Judge Cynthia Giuliani  transforms to a fairy godmother  to makes kids’ adoptions wishes a reality in court. On Monday, Oct. 31 from 9:30 to 11 a.m. at Family Court, 601 N. Pecos Road, in courtroom 22 the special adoption event will take place. The children are invited to come in costume and are given treats.

This is the fifth year Judge Giuliani will create the special adoptions experience around Halloween. “This is a life-changing experience for these families. Granting adoptions and making them special and memorable is the best part of my job,” said Judge Giuliani. “Seeing the happiness of the children who know they will be loved and cared for is so uplifting and hopefully inspiring for others to consider adoption or foster care.”

The District Court Family Division is involved in other special adoption events, including an annual adoption day marathon which is scheduled this year for November 17. For more information about adoption, call the Clark County Department of Family Services at 702-455-0800 or e-mail DFSAdoptions@ClarkCountyNV.gov.

“There is a significant need for caring families who will adopt, foster or even volunteer as court advocates for abused and neglected children. This adoption event is a unique way to make it special for the families and get the word out on the need,” said Family Division Presiding Judge Charles Hoskin.

 

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Blue Diamond awards were presented to Truancy Diversion Program volunteer judges at a recognition event for those who are helping to keep Clark County students in school and on track to graduate. The volunteers work with the students weekly to help them transition from diamonds in the rough to brilliant young graduates.

Clark County reported over 240,000 truant children for school-year 2014-2015. Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the Clark County School District has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

The TDP was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002. Since 2007, the program has been overseen by District Court Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the CCSD.  Judges, attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers volunteer approximately three hours each week to and hold truancy court sessions at schools, where they meet individually with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to 80 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all Clark County schools have a TDP program.

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional or law enforcement officer and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program please contact DeDe Parker at: 702-321-2410.The Family Court youth programs are a great example of how the Eighth Judicial District Court is using alternative, efficient methods to address crime and ensure justice. District Court continuously works to develop innovative ideas, improve efficiencies, address issues and improve access to justice.

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Judge Dianne Steel at Guardianship Bench Bar meeting

Judge Dianne Steel at Guardianship Bench Bar meeting

If you’re an attorney who handles guardianship cases, set your reminder for the Monday, May 16 Guardianship Bench Bar at the Public Guardian’s office at 515 Shadow Lane. It’s a brown-bag, open forum from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. to learn important information and ask questions. Judge Dianne Steel presides over the meeting that will cover hot topics for guardianship cases.

Bench Bar Agenda 5-16-16-05132016113659

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Children who have experienced traumatizing family situations and placed into foster care will gain a new voice when 17 new Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteers will be sworn in at a ceremony at the Eighth Judicial District Family Court on Monday, May 16 at noon, at Family Court, Courtroom 9, 601 N. Pecos Road. The volunteers successfully completed specialized training to give them the tools they need to serve as an effective voice for children and to give them a say on what happens with their life.

There are currently 357 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for foster children in our community. Many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the nearly 3,500 children receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Last year, more than 900 children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, and deal with school challenges and home life. The goal is to get a volunteer to be a voice for every foster child.

“CASA volunteers play a very important role to help ensure that children don’t get lost in the system,” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan, who will administer the oath to the CASA volunteers. “When Children have a CASA, they have a voice. When they have a voice, they have hope. When they have hope, they have a future. These kids deserve everything we want for our own kids. So, I urge those who are able, to step forward and volunteer to be a voice for children. The relationship you establish with a child will last a lifetime.”

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them. In 1980, Judge John Mendoza led the creation of the Clark County CASA Program. The CASA mission continues to be fully supported by Family Court judges.

“The court has committed substantial resources to improve the outcomes for abuse and neglect cases, and to give the children what they need to be able to be in a safe and permanent home. We have moved to a one-judge one-family policy to give judges more time with cases and help them to get to know the kids and their needs.” said Presiding Family Court Judge Charles Hoskin. “CASA volunteers play a crucial role in achieving the best possible outcomes by conveying the children’s point of view.”

For those interested in volunteering with CASA, monthly orientations are held on the third Wednesday of each month to provide more information about the program. Upcoming orientations will be held at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. For more information about the program please call 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas.

 

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