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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Category Archives: Las Vegas Legal Education

To aid those who represent themselves in court and improve access to justice, the Eighth Judicial District Court offers 23 Guide and File forms at the Legal Aid Self-help Centers at the Regional Justice Center, at family court, or to  those with Internet access.  The system guides self represented or pro per litigants through the completion of  legal forms with focused questions. Completed forms can then be filed at the courthouse into the court case management system.

The civil and family law Legal Aid Self-Help Centers have introduced 23 guided interviews, with more being developed. The guided interviews ensure that litigants create clear and legible filings that meet all requirements. Those who work in the Legal Aid Self-Help Centers report that through the use of Guide and File, there has been a marked reduction in errors. Cutting errors when filings are initiated, saves users time and facilitates court processes. Prior to the implementation of Guide and File, court time was tied up addressing improper filings.

Thousands of interviews have been successfully completed including: Nevada protection orders against stalking or harassment, adult name changes,  District Court fee waivers,  complaints for divorce,  joint petitions for divorce (no kids),  joint petitions for divorce, petitions to disburse money, small claims complaints, summary eviction complaints,  tenant answer to summary evictions, custody complaints , divorce answers and counterclaims,  custody answers and counterclaims , unemployment judicial reviews step one petitions, petitions to order release of medical records, petitions for cremation, criminal record sealing requests and  small claims answers/counterclaims. In District Court user surveys, most report Guide and File as very easy or easy to use, with few respondents reporting the system as difficult or very difficult.

The following Guide and File forms/interviews are in use:

  1. Adult name change request
  2. District Court fee waiver
  3. Joint petition for divorce
  4. Complaint for Divorce
  5. Divorce Answer and Counterclaim
  6. Custody Complaint
  7. Custody Answer & Counterclaim
  8. Petition to disburse money from a minor’s blocked account
  9. Small claims complaint
  10. Tenant answer to summary eviction
  11. NV protection Order against stalking or harassment
  12. Collection of Judgment
  13. Summary Eviction Complaint
  14. Petition for Cremation
  15. Petition for Special Letters of Administration
  16. Petition to Open Safe Deposit Box
  17. Petition to Order release of Medical Records
  18. Unemployment Judicial Review –Start:  Which Interview is right?
  19. Unemployment Judicial review – Petition for Judicial Review
  20. Unemployment Judicial Review – Opening Brief
  21. Unemployment Judicial Review – Reply Brief
  22. Petition for Transfer of Property & Affidavit of Entitlement
  23. Small Claims Counterclaim

A citizen oriented approach is necessary to ensure access to justice for all. People are becoming more accustomed to, and in many cases, demanding of, do-it-yourself options; not only because they tend to be cheaper, but also because electronic filings offer more flexibility. From a cost, efficiency and user standpoint, Guide and File offers a solution to an issue that has challenged the courts.

The Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court Guide and File system made the list of the top-10 court technology solutions as named by the National Association for Court Management  and the 2018 Tyler Excellence Award.

 

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Nearly 80 fifth graders from Vanderberg Elementary School, quietly lined up on the first floor of the Regional Justice Center on April 23, as they waited excitedly to go to various courtrooms to watches judges go through their criminal calendars to status check cases, set dates and hand down sentences. The students, who were on their best behavior, were told to pay attention to all the work being done in the courtrooms and to consider this work as a future job for themselves. They were also told to observe each case and learn from them.

We’ve all heard the cliché crime doesn’t pay. The fifth graders from Vanderberg got a first-hand look at why the cliché is actually true, including those who visited District Court Judge Michael Villani’s courtroom to watch his felony criminal calendar proceedings. Judge Villani went through case after case, setting dates for further action and handing down sentences. Judge Villani asked a young man with a long prior record who was being sentenced for snatching a purse, “What can we do to get your attention?”  The young man tried to convince the judge that he had changed and had stayed out of trouble for a while. Judge Villani wasn’t convinced. He sentenced him to boot camp, a regimented program aimed at rehabilitating participants through education and life skills training, manual labor and extensive physical training. He was handcuffed and led off to a holding cell.

After the calendar session, the students watched as the defendants who had been sitting in the courtroom were led away in shackles to a holding area for transport back to the jail. On the way out, one of the defendants blurted, “Stay in school.”

In a question and answer session with the students, Judge Villani shared that he rather the young man who snatched the purse get help, not just punishment. He noted that what many of the defendants have in common is they don’t finish school and they get involved with drugs. Judge Villani said, “If you don’t finish high school, it’s hard to get a job.” He also advised the students that they will probably face peer pressure to do drugs. He warned of the downward spiral that results and is common to many who are convicted of crimes and end up in prison.

The school visit was part of the Project Real youth educational program. Project REAL, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization, was founded in 2005 by Sam Lionel and Irwin Molasky to meet the challenge of teaching kindergarten through 12th grade Nevada students the importance of the law. They have taught over 160,000 Nevada students about the importance of the law with the goal of preparing them to be informed, law-abiding and participating citizens through their programs including: Your Day in Court, Play By the Rules, REAL Drama, and Independence & You. For more information from Project REAL, please contact Program Director Mike Kamer at mkamer@projectrealnv.org, call 702.703.6529, or visit http://projectrealnv.org.

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Alexandra McLeod awarded prizes to chili cook-off winners at February Civil Bench-Bar meeting. Nadia Con Magdenko was the grand prize winner. T. Augustus Claus won second place and Lauren Peña won third prize. The winners took home lovely engraved spoons. The cook-off is an annual event at the Civil Bench-Bar meeting that are held the second Tuesday of each month to give attorneys members of the Bar Association an opportunity learn about the many changes that occur at the court and to get issues addressed with the bench. The next Civil Bench-Bar Meeting will be held March 12 at noon in courtroom 10D.

 

 

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Don’t miss the October 9 Civil Bench Bar Meeting from noon to 1 p.m. in courtroom 10D of the Regional Justice Center for a free, frightfully good continuing legal education (CLE). The State Bar of Nevada  Office of Bar Counsel will do a half credit CLE on Governance of the Profession with speaker Daniel Hooge (CLE sign in sheet will be provided at luncheon).

Judge Nancy Allf will also demystify interpleaders.

October is Pro Bono Month and Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada will share tricks of the trade for tapping the treats that go with volunteering to take a pro bono case.

Lunch is limited to the first 60 attendee. Get there before it disappears.

Civil Bench Bar meetings offer members of the bar the latest news from District Court, a forum to get questions addressed and a chance to grab a quick bite to eat while networking.

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Don’t miss the Joint Guardianship/Probate/Trust/Elder Law Bench Bar Meeting Monday, June 25, from noon to 1 p.m., in courtroom 10D at the Regional Justice Center. Attorneys who attend the session will get one Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit. A legislative report will cover proposed guardianship rules and forms.

Those who attend should bring a printout of this packet JointBenchBarPacket6_18

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Two classes of third graders from the Las Vegas Day School held mock trials in Judge Jennifer Togliatti’s courtroom. The first class put fairy-tale sweetheart Goldilocks on trial for bad manners. Junior attorneys called witnesses including the entire Bear family and presented evidence including Baby Bear’s broken chair. A jury of her peers took copious notes, deliberated and found the accused guilty. Goldilocks was cuffed.

The second class heard the case against the Big Bad Wolf, who now goes by B. B. Wolf. An expert witness and others testified against the wolf who claimed he was just paying a visit to a friend.

The mock trials are a fun way for young students to learn about the justice system and get a feel for legal careers.

 

 

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Four fourth grade classes from Liliam Lujan Hickey Elementary School experienced justice in action at the Eighth Judicial District Court in early April. They  also got a view on where life-choices lead when they sat in on actual criminal calendars and saw judges, court employees and attorneys perform their jobs. They watched defendants in various stages of their cases, including sentencing. After viewing the calendar, students asked judges questions about  what they saw, and how and why it works that way. The Q&A session was followed by a mock trial of Harry Potter, who was charged with misappropriation of magic. The school visits are part of a new joint program between nonprofit agency Project Real, the District Court and schools.

District Court Judge Doug Herndon envisioned this mock trial program. He wrote the script to provide a fun and interesting method for young students to learn about the justice system. The activities promote the importance of education, highlight potential legal careers and demonstrate the outcome of bad choices. “This program is a good way for young students to see the legal profession in action. When they watch actual court proceedings, they see the unfortunate consequences of criminal activity,” said Judge Herndon. “The mock trials give the students a way to relate to and understand the justice system, and see career roles that they may want to consider in the future.”

Project REAL, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization, was founded in 2005 by Sam Lionel and Irwin Molasky to meet the challenge of teaching K-12th grade Nevada students the importance of the law. They have taught over 160,000 Nevada students about the importance of the law with the goal of preparing them to be informed, law-abiding and participating citizens through their programs Your Day in Court, Play By the Rules, REAL Drama, and Independence & You. For more information from Project REAL, please contact Program Director Mike Kamer at mkamer@projectrealnv.org, call 702.703.6529, or visit http://projectrealnv.org.

The mock trial program is intended to contrast the view of careers in the justice system against the choice to get involved in criminal activity. This collaboration between the courts, Project Real and Hickey Elementary School involved a lot of work on the part of the judges and their departments in District Court, Project Real, and the teachers. Thanks to the many people who helped to make it come together so that the students could benefit from a real-world perspective.

 

 

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