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Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Tag Archives: Judge Bryce Duckworth

Professionals in academics, gaming, tech, the military an other walks of life will add richness to their lives when they take an oath as CASA volunteers on Monday, Oct. 29 at noon at Family Court, Courtroom 9, 601 N. Pecos Road.

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The volunteers speak on behalf of children in foster care who have endured abuse and neglect. The give input in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community, who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Those who want to help abused and neglected children are invited to one of the upcoming CASA orientations, which are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas. Due to the Thanksgiving holiday the next CASA orientation will be held on Nov. 14 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy.

“Children who have endured abuse and neglect are traumatized. They need stability in their life and someone to speak up for them to communicate what is in their best interest,” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan, who will administer the oath to the CASA volunteers. “CASAs bring a much needed voice stability. They give judges a picture of what’s going on with a child and they offer the children consistency.”

There are around 329 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for children under the supervision of the Family Court CASA Program. Many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the remainder of the children in care. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

“Volunteering to help these children in need is a tangible way to make a difference and have a huge impact on the life of a child,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Bryce Duckworth. “The need is big and the feeling of reward is great.”

“You’ll never do anything that will be more fulfilling than being a CASA,” said Carolyn Muscari, A 37-year CASA volunteer. “It’s the best paying job I ever had, and I never made a cent. I get paid in satisfaction. You can make a difference and it makes you feel good.”

 

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Scarlett & Stephanie Bagunu help put out more than 300 pinwheels at Family Court to remind people that there are more than 3,000 children in our community who need someone to speak up on their behalf.

Thirteen new CASA volunteers from all walks of life are stepping up for children who have endured abuse and neglect, and are now in foster care. The volunteers will take an oath to speak on behalf of  more than 27 kids on Monday, July 30 at noon at Family Court, Courtroom 9, 601 N. Pecos Road. The volunteers, including a lawyer, travel agent, tax specialist, music teacher, mom, event planner, county liaison, mental health professional and retirees will speak up for the young children whose parents are working through addiction and other issues.

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community, who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Those who want to help abused and neglected children are invited to one of the upcoming CASA orientations, which are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas. The next CASA orientation will be held on Aug. 15 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy.

“Our goal is to have a CASA volunteer for every child in foster care. When you give abused and neglected kids a CASA, you give them a voice. When you give them a voice, you give them hope. When you give them hope, you give them a future,” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan, who will administer the oath to the CASA volunteers. “When you volunteer as a CASA, you get more back from the kids than you give.”

There are around 350 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for children under the supervision of the Family Court CASA Program. However, many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the remainder of the children in care. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

“The CASA program and volunteers have accomplished much to stabilize the lives of countless foster children who have endured trauma in their lives,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Bryce Duckworth. “I thank the many volunteers who have stepped up to help children in need. Their commitment and willingness to speak up for kids has an enduring impact.”

In 1980, Judge John Mendoza led the creation of the Clark County CASA Program. The CASA mission continues to be fully supported by Family Court Judges. For those interested in volunteering with CASA, monthly orientations are held on the third Wednesday of each month to provide more information about the program.

 

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Attorney James Claflin Jr.was selected to be the family law Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada pro bono May volunteer of the month. Judge Frank Sullivan and Judge Bryce Duckworth presented the award. Award clip:  https://youtu.be/r8caUR0G-5w

A sense of gratitude is what drives James to do pro bono work. Attorney James Claflin Jr.clip:  https://youtu.be/Uyn8NVBWznY

The award was given at the Family Law Bench-Bar meeting. The meetings are held once a month to ensure attorneys have access to all the information they need to practice in the Family Division. Topics covered include recent Nevada Supreme Court rulings, new technology, court news and hot topics.

 

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Chronic absence correlated to high dropout rates has long been an issue in Nevada’s public schools. A recent report shows recent improvement in Clark County graduation rates. According to the Clark County School District (CCSD), one of the key programs to combat habitual absenteeism is the Truancy Diversion Program (TDP). As the school year winds down, it is a perfect time to recognize Truancy Diversion Program volunteers who commit to a school-year of weekly truancy diversion court sessions to keep kids in school and on track to graduate. The volunteer judges/mentors will be recognized on Friday, May 18 from noon to 2 p.m. at the Social Club Ballroom at Main Street Station 200 N. Main Street. The volunteers will be given an award and the opportunity to share their experiences of helping students attain an education. The TDP volunteers see first-hand how keeping a student in school can be the difference between failure and graduation; and between a path of crime and a path of success.

District Court Judge William Voy currently oversee the TDP that was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002, and overseen by Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the Clark County School District (CCSD) for 10 years. “As a judge who hears juvenile cases, I see firsthand the importance of education and graduation. The Truancy Diversion program has proven to be an effective part of the strategy to keep students in school and on track to graduate. The volunteers are key to this much-needed program, and their work has done much to improve the path of many students,” said Judge Voy. “The Truancy Diversion Program not only benefits those students who are struggling to complete their education, but it benefits our community as a whole.”

In the 2016/2017 school-year, the TDP was in more than 80 CCSD elementary, middle schools and high schools. In the 2017/2018 school year, the TDP program plummeted to 40 participating schools, due to the ending of grant for the program from the Office of Juvenile Justice Department of Prevention Keeping Kids in School and Out of Court (OJJDP). Since the grant expired, funding has been an issue, since each school must use school funds to pay for the program.

Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. “Kids who successfully complete school have a much better chance at success in life than those who drop out,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Bryce Duckworth. “Truancy is often the first step off the path to success. The Truancy Diversion Program addresses the issue and keeps students in school and on track to graduate.”

Judges, attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers volunteer approximately three hours each week to hold truancy court sessions at schools. They promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all Clark County schools have a TDP program.

Licensed attorneys, mental health professionals or law enforcement officers who are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program should call 702-455-1755. The Family Court youth programs are a great example of how the Eighth Judicial District Court is using alternative, efficient methods to address crime and ensure justice. District Court continuously works to develop innovative ideas, improve efficiency, address issues and improve access to justice

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Seventeen new CASA volunteers have opened their hearts to children who have endured abuse and neglect. The volunteers took an oath to speak on behalf of  kids. The volunteers, including a tax specialist, teacher, chiropractor, hairdresser and former foster parent will serve as a voice for the young children whose parents are working through addiction and other issues. Three CASA volunteers were also recognized for their volunteer work to help children.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community, who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Those who want to help abused and neglected children are invited to one of the upcoming CASA orientations, which are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas. The next CASA orientation will be held on May 16 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central  Pkwy.

There are around 350 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for children under the supervision of the Family Court CASA Program. However, many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the remainder of the children in care. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them.

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Seventeen new CASA volunteers have opened their hearts to children who have endured abuse and neglect. The volunteers will take an oath to speak on behalf of  47 kids on Monday, Feb. 12 at noon at Family Court, Courtroom 9, 601 N. Pecos Road.

The volunteers, including a retired teacher, police officer and principal, will serve as a voice for the young children whose parents are working through addiction and other issues. The volunteers also include former foster youth , foster parents, adoptive parents and a Veterans Administration social worker.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community, who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Those who want to help abused and neglected children are invited to one of the upcoming CASA orientations, which are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas. The next CASA orientation will be held on Feb. 21 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central  Pkwy.

“Our goal is to have a CASA volunteer for every child in foster care. When you give abused and neglected kids a CASA, you give them a voice. When you give them a voice, you give them hope. When you give them hope, you give them a future,” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan, who will administer the oath to the CASA volunteers. “When you volunteer as a CASA, it’s so rewarding and you get so much back.”                                      Scarlett & Stephanie Bagunu

There are around 350 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for children under the supervision of the Family Court CASA Program. However, many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the remainder of the children in care. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

“CASA volunteers help to stabilize the lives of foster children who have endured tremendous instability in their lives,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Bryce Duckworth. “I encourage those who want to add meaning to their life to consider volunteering as a CASA; and I thank those who are already volunteering for their commitment.”

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them. In 1980, Judge John Mendoza led the creation of the Clark County CASA Program. The CASA mission continues to be fully supported by Family Court Judges. For those interested in volunteering with CASA, monthly orientations are held on the third Wednesday of each month to provide more information about the program.

 

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Judge Bryce Duckworth will take on the role to preside over the Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division, effective January 1. Judge Duckworth will take over for Judge Charles Hoskin, who has served as the presiding judge of the Family Division for two terms.

“I appreciate the work that Judge Hoskin has done while presiding over the Family Division,” said Judge Duckworth. “In taking on this role of presiding judge, I will continue to work diligently to facilitate the important work of the Family Division to provide families and individuals a means to address difficult circumstances, heal and find closure.”

Judge Bryce Duckworth was elected in 2008. Prior to taking the bench in January 2009, Judge Duckworth practiced law with Dickerson, Dickerson, Lieberman & Consul (later known as Dickerson, Dickerson, Consul & Pocker), practicing primarily in the area of family law. He worked as an associate attorney and later became a shareholder at Dickerson, Dickerson, Consul & Pocker. In 2004, he joined the law firm of Smith, Larsen & Wixom, where he managed their family law department. Judge Duckworth is from Salt Lake City, Utah and attended the S.J. Quinney School of Law at the University of Utah. While at the S.J. Quinney School of Law, he was honored as a William H. Leary Scholar. He also served as a member of the Utah Law Review.

“I look forward to working with Judge Duckworth as the presiding Family division Judge. He is very well respected and I anticipate he will bring good ideas and positive energy to the role,” said District Court Chief Judge Elizabeth Gonzalez. “I  also want to thank Judge Hoskin for his service presiding over the Family Division for two terms.”

Judge Duckworth is a member of the Clark County Bar Association, the State Bar of Nevada, and the Family Law Section of the State Bar of Nevada. On December 7, Judge Duckworth was awarded the Heroes of Justice Award 2017, “for his integrity, honesty, courage and dedication to the administration of justice.” In 2016, he was appointed to serve on the State of Nevada Standing Committee on Judicial Ethics and continues to serve on the committee.

He served as the Chair of the Family Law Executive Council for the Family Law Section of the State Bar of Nevada from March 2007 until March 2009. Judge Duckworth also served as a member of the Judicial Council of the State of Nevada and the Certified Court Interpreters Advisory Committee.

Judge Hoskin turns over the post of presiding judge after serving four years. He has served on the bench since 2009. He will return to presiding over a full docket of family related cases.

 

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