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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Monthly Archives: September 2015

There are a lot of attorneys looking to bolster their reputation. At the same time, there are a lot of young people who need guidance from just such professionals to motivate them to attend school and do what it takes to be successful. The District Court Truancy Diversion Program (TDP) is a match made in heaven for these two groups. The lawyers get to do positive work and the benefit of experience and as volunteer judges; and the students get guidance from professionals that could mean the difference between a life of success and a life behind bars.

Today, Family Division Judge Jennifer Elliot kicked-off the TDP program with a meeting with the volunteer judges to exchange ideas on what works to get students to understand the importance of their education and how to address challenges as they arise. Many of the students face basic problems that seem insurmountable to them due to a lack of communications skills, resources or fear. Representatives from the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges attended to get ideas to share nationally.

The Truancy Diversion Project (TDP) aimed at improving student school attendance and success in classes currently has around 69 volunteers. A lot more are needed to meet the goal to get the program at every school. Clark County reported nearly 120,000 truant children for school-year 2013-2014.Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

Judges, attorneys and other qualified applicants volunteering approximately three hours each week to and hold truancy court sessions at schools where they meeting individually with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to 70 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all 358 Clark County schools have a TDP program. In 2014, the TDP was one of four programs in the nation to receive a $600,000 grant from the Department of Justice designed to keep kids in school and out of court.

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional or law enforcement officer and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program please contact DeDe Parker at: 702-321-2410.

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The new school year is in full-swing and it is important that students get the year off to a good start so they can graduate to the next level. The Truancy Diversion Project (TDP) aimed at improving student school attendance and success in classes, is gearing up to provide support with a kickoff event for volunteer judges on Monday, Sept. 28 at 11:30 a.m. in Zenoff Hall behind the Family Court, 601 N. Pecos Road. The event is part pep-rally, part final preparation as the volunteer judges head out to 70 schools across the valley.

The TDP was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002. Since 2007, the program has been overseen by District Court Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the Clark County School District CCSD.

“I am excited to begin another school year of being part of the solution to the significant problem of truancy in our schools,” said Judge Elliott. “The volunteer judges are really making a big difference to help struggling students with issues that are getting in the way of their education and ultimately their success. Our goal is to get these students to graduate so they have future opportunities for college or a career,” said Judge Elliott.

Clark County reported nearly 120,000 truant children for school-year 2013-2014.Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

Judges, attorneys and other qualified applicants volunteering approximately three hours each week to and hold truancy court sessions at schools where they meeting individually with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to 70 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all 358 Clark County schools have a TDP program. In 2014, the TDP was one of four programs in the nation to receive a $600,000 grant from the Department of Justice designed to keep kids in school and out of court.

“It’s impressive to see the growth in the Truancy Diversion Program and to know that more students are being helped reach the goal of graduation.” said Presiding Family Court Judge Charles Hoskin. “Providing guidance and resources for young people to be successful in school helps them to establish a foundation for successful future.”

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional or law enforcement officer and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program please contact DeDe Parker at: 702-321-2410.

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Criminal Caseflow FINAL 9 21 2015

Two new administrative orders (15-10, 15-11) have been issued by Chief Judge David Barker that outline changes to Eighth Judicial District assignments. These changes include broadening the departments that may now be assigned conflict, recusal, DQ, or peremptory challenge cases in Probate or Guardianship from the primary judge.

  • Civil /Criminal Assignment Matrix (8/2015),
  • Criminal Case Flow Model (9/21/15), and
  • Administrative Order 15-11(9/16/15).

Effective Sept. 21, the distribution of criminal NLVJC cases for Track 2 has expanded to include Judge Togliatti. This will balance out the NLVJC 1 assignments.

Judge Israel is now hearing the Eviction / TPO appeals calendar from Judge Togliatti.

Judge Togliatti will continue hearing the Competency calendar and is added back into the NLVJC 1 rotation with Judge Walsh.

Judge Sturman continues hearing Probate.

Judge(s) Gonzalez, Earley, Allf have Probate conflicts.

Judge Steel continues hearing Guardianship.

Judge(s) Sturman, Miley, Allf have Guardianship conflicts.

Judge Allf will be assisting Judge Scann in hearing certain Business Court Cases consistent with Administrative Order 15-11.

There have been no physical moves or changes in contact numbers.

See the administrative orders at http://www.clarkcountycourts.us/rules.html.

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Judge Susan Scann recently received an award for outstanding service in law and politics from the Clark County Democratic Lawyers Caucus. Judge Scann is the premier recipient of the honor and hence the award will bear her name. Judge Scann received the award for her impressive 39-year legal career including service on the bench of the Eighth Judicial District Court and work as an alternate Municipal Court judge for the city of Las Vegas. Judge Scann has many outstanding accomplishments including: service as a member of the Clark County Fee Dispute Committee, president of Southern Nevada Association Women Attorneys, service on the State Bar Ethics Committee and on the Clark County Bar CLE Committee. She is a founding member of the Clark County Bar Pro Bono Committee, a member of Rotary International and received the 1995 Professionalism Award from the Clark County Bar Association.

The Susan Scann award will be given out annually to a lawyer or judge who has exemplified dedication, commitment and ethics in their conduct.

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The District Court probate division has moved to the Regional Justice Center from the Family Court campus. Those who want to file a probate pleading should do so in the Clerk’s Office on third floor. Those who need forms, help completing forms, or otherwise have general questions about the probate process can visit the Civil Self-help Center on the first floor of the RJC at 200 Lewis Ave.

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The next Civil Bench Bar meeting will be at noon on Tuesday, September 8 in courtroom 15D at the Regional Justice Center.    All members of the bar are welcome. Lunch will be provided. If you have any agenda items you would like added, please email johnsonsu@clarkcountycourts.us. The Civil Bench Bar is intended to bring the judiciary and members of the bar together to discuss ways to improve the processing and handling of civil matters.