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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Category Archives: Specialty Courts

The monthly celebration to mark graduations from intensive specialty court treatment programs had 51 participants cross the finish line to start their lifelong process to be substance-abuse free. The graduations spread a positive ripple-effect through the people in their families and the community. Their families now have a loved one who is contributing instead of disrupting their lives. The community as whole will also benefit from this group of people committed to a better life. At an estimated jail cost of $135 per-day per-inmate, 51 successful graduates will save more than $2.5 million a year in incarceration costs alone. The social benefits are immeasurable from those who want to contribute to the community instead of disrupt. The graduating class includes participants from veterans’ court, mental health court, the OPEN program, drug court and felony DUI court.

Six veterans were part of the large August graduating class. They were wrapped in beautiful quilts specially made by the Quilts of Valor non-profit organization to give them comfort and remind them that their service is appreciated.

Specialty courts solve issues through a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement, court program coordinators and mental health/social service/treatment professionals. All work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens. The National Association of Drug Court Professionals reports: “nationwide, 75 percent of drug court graduates remain arrest-free at least two years after leaving the program. Drug courts reduce crime as much as 35 percent more than other sentencing options.”

The Eighth Judicial District Specialty Courts were recently awarded a grant of $1million from the Substance Abuse Prevention Treatment Agency (SAPTA) to provide sober living and residential treatment placements for individuals in the Clark County Detention Center (CCDC). The SAPTA Grant provides funding for sober living facilities and residential bed infrastructure in Clark County to reduce the average number of days jailed drug court candidates spend waiting for residential placement. Drug court participants have significantly higher rates of success in programs that offer a continuum of care for substance abuse treatment with residential treatment and sober living. That success reduces the burdens on the jail, the justice system and the community as a whole. In FY 2018, 111 participants were provided residential treatment and 189 were provided supportive sober living, with 162 participants obtaining employment.

The Quilts of Valor Foundation was founded in 2003, by Blue Star mom Catherine Roberts from her sewing room. Blue Star moms are those who have a son or daughter in active service. Her son Nathanael’s deployment to Iraq served as the initial inspiration for the foundation. That has since presented thousands of quilts nationwide to those who have served our country.

The local chapter of Quilts of Valor meets the second Friday of the month at 8670 W. Cheyenne Ave. from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in room 105. Volunteers are always welcome; no quilting experience is necessary. For more information call 702-357-0377.

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The Eighth Judicial District Specialty Courts have been awarded a grant of $1million from the Substance Abuse Prevention Treatment Agency (SAPTA) to provide sober living and residential treatment placements for individuals in the Clark County Detention Center (CCDC). The SAPTA Grant provides funding for sober living facilities and residential bed infrastructure in Clark County to reduce the average number of days jailed drug court candidates spend waiting for residential placement. Drug court participants have significantly higher rates of success in programs that offer a continuum of care for substance abuse treatment with residential treatment and sober living. That success reduces the burdens on the jail, the justice system and the community as a whole.

In FY 2018, 111 participants were provided residential treatment and 189 were provided supportive sober living, with 162 participants obtaining employment.

In compliance with the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP) recommended adult drug court practices, individuals in need of substance abuse treatment should not be incarcerated to achieve clinical or social service objectives. Clark County has a growing need for sufficient sober living and residential placement facilities for inpatient substance abuse treatment. As a result, individuals remain in jail awaiting substance abuse treatment. The District Court estimates the annual fiscal savings that will result to Clark County at more than $4 million in averted incarceration and associated criminal justice costs.

“I am grateful to receive this grant money to provide sober living and residential treatment placements for specialty court participants,” said Chief Judge Linda Marie Bell. “This funding greatly improves the chances of success for those who are provided placements, reduces the critically overcrowded jail population, and saves millions of dollars in avoided incarceration costs.”

Specialty courts solve issues through a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement, court program coordinators and mental health/social service/treatment professionals. All work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens. The National Association of Drug Court Professionals reports: “nationwide, 75 percent of drug court graduates remain arrest-free at least two years after leaving the program. Drug courts reduce crime as much as 35 percent more than other sentencing options.”

 

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When you walk into a specialty court graduation ceremony you know you’re entering something really special. There is excitement and optimism in the air. Families and friends are present with balloons, flowers and cake to support their loved ones. The monthly District Court graduations in the jury services room mark a point of change. Hearing Master Melissa De La Garza reminds participants to savor the moment and remember how they feel as they graduate. The grads will need that thought and that feeling to carry them through the tough times and help them to maintain their commitment to be substance-abuse free.

Hearing Master Melissa De La Garza https://youtu.be/IjM_Mdawo44

Deputy Public Defender Christy Craig https://youtu.be/jf94O1_qMt8

Each month, nearly 30 participants graduate from intensive specialty court treatment programs. Eighty-nine participants graduated from the District specialty courts programs in the past three months. Multiply that times all the people in their families and you can get a sense of the kind of impact that the programs are having on the community. That’s 89 families who have a loved one who is contributing instead of disrupting their lives. The community as whole will also benefit from this wave of people committed to a better life. At an estimated jail cost of $135 per-day per-inmate, 89 successful graduates saves $12,015 a night and more than $4.3  million a year in incarceration costs alone. The social benefits are immeasurable. The graduating class includes participants from veterans court, mental health court, the OPEN program, drug court and felony DUI court.

Kicking addiction and giving up the life that goes with it isn’t easy. “I know you worked really hard to get to this point it is just the beginning though and there is a lot of work to do in the future. It is a great time to celebrate the accomplishments you have achieved so far,” said Judge Linda Bell, who presides over specialty courts. “We really look forward seeing all the things that you do as you move on from specialty courts.”

Judge Linda Marie Bell at specialty court graduation https://youtu.be/LI45EnZ-mR4

Specialty courts take a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement and mental health/social service/treatment professionals to make the transition possible. All work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens and it’s worth it. Treating addiction and related disorders has proven to be a much more effective way to address crime surround substance abuse rather than let low-level offenders revolve through the prison system.

“It’s not the end of the road for your sobriety. It’s a lifetime of sobriety,” said Jude Carolyn Ellsworth, who presides over drug court. “Now you have the tools and you know how to handle things when time get rough.”

Judge Carolyn Ellsworth https://youtu.be/oKy9-BQGxFU

Jarenie Trachier Quilts of Valor non-profit organization

https://youtu.be/ieSH3VlX4IQ

Deputy Public Defender Christy Craig https://youtu.be/jf94O1_qMt8

 

Judge Linda Marie Bell at specialty court graduation

https://youtu.be/LI45EnZ-mR4

Judge Carolyn Ellsworth

https://youtu.be/oKy9-BQGxFU

Hearing Master Melissa De La Garza

https://youtu.be/IjM_Mdawo44

Deputy Public Defender Christy Craig

https://youtu.be/jf94O1_qMt8

Jarenie Trachier Quilts of Valor non-profit organization

https://youtu.be/ieSH3VlX4IQ

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Seven felony DUI court participants crossed the finish line to graduate from the rigorous program. The graduates discussed what helped them during their three-year (plus) journey and their after-care plan to ensure they continue their quest for life-long recovery. Family members came to show support and celebrate with cupcakes, certificates and photos. Two of the graduates who initially resisted the program, spoke about how they now realize it saved their lives. It was a sentiment share by all those who successfully completed the program and graduate.

“These graduations are very important,” said Judge Adriana Escobar, who presides over the felony DUI court. “Successful completion of this program is positive for the graduates, our community public safety and for the justice system. A tremendous amount of resources and money are saved by not having these participants revolving through the prison system.”

The felony DUI court is one of several specialty courts including: veterans’ court, mental health court, the OPEN program, drug court and dependency mothers’ drug court that have been proven to be a successful way to get people off substance abuse and on track to productive lives.

Specialty courts solve issues through a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement and mental health/social service/treatment professionals. All work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens. The National Association of Drug Court Professionals reports: “nationwide, 75 percent of drug court graduates remain arrest-free at least two years after leaving the program. Drug courts reduce crime as much as 35 percent more than other sentencing options.”

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District Court will celebrate another specialty court graduation just as the program prepares to ramp up with a new infusion of funding. The newly minted specialty court grads will receive certificates and accolades on Friday, Jan. 15 at 2 p.m., in the Regional Justice Center jury services room at 200 Lewis Ave. The graduating class includes 64 participants from veterans court, mental health court, the OPEN program, drug court and felony DUI court; programs that have proven to be a successful way to get people off substance abuse and on track to productive lives.

The Nevada Legislature through the Administrative Office of the Courts and the Nevada Supreme Court has increased and consolidated funding for specialty courts with an additional $3 million for fiscal 2016 statewide. Southern Nevada, which includes limited jurisdiction courts, received $1.8 million of that funding. All courts plan to increase levels of participation in all programs.

The Eighth Judicial District Court will increase specialty drug court participation from 300 to 500. Felony DUI court is expected to increase from 450 to 550 participants. Mental Health Court will go from 100 to 200 participants. Veteran’s court is expected to increase from current levels to 45 participants. The OPEN program will grow to meet the need.

To meet the demands of this growing and challenging caseload, the court will diversify the specialty courts judicial assignments. Effective Feb. 16, Judge Adriana Escobar will continue to preside in courtroom 3F over felony DWI (serious offender program) and veteran’s court and assume Judge Carolyn Ellsworth’s civil calendar. Judge Ellsworth will handle drug court and keep her current criminal calendar in courtroom 16D. Chief Judge David Barker will handle mental health court and OPEN (Courtroom TBD).

“The specialty courts are an effective way to dispense justice and achieve rehabilitation,“ said Chief Judge Barker. “This new funding is much needed and will go further to ensure that those committing crimes and revolving through the justice system as a result of substance abuse, recover and go on to live productive lives.

color head and shoulders

Judge Ellsworth will handle drug court and keep her current criminal calendar in courtroom 16D.

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This Friday, specialty court graduates who have evolved over years of intensive treatment and rehabilitation programs will get a fresh start for spring. The 67 grads from the Eighth Judicial District specialty courts will shed their old lives and begin their new lives. They leave behind the revolving door of repeated incarcerations due to substance abuse offenses and crime, to forge a life of responsibility and productivity. On Friday, Apr. 3 at 2 p.m., in the Regional Justice Center jury services room at 200 Lewis Ave., the specialty court grads celebrate their accomplishments. A special certificate will mark the launch of the grads’ new lives, and they will get applause and encouragement from judges, family, friends, counselors and each other for successful completion of years of treatment.

Arrest mug shots will be projected behind the grads to remind them how far they’ve come and to serve as a stark reminder to stay the course. The pomp and circumstance of the graduation marks a big occasion for the families of those who have successfully completed years of treatment in the drug, mental health, DUI, veterans’ and OPEN court. The community reaps benefits from the program in terms of tax dollars saved, social services spared and crime averted.

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Letteredited
“Life with an addicted mother is like looking down a dark tunnel.”

Being the child of an addict is the worst, but watching them grow and recover is the best. I am here to speak today because no parent truly understands what a child goes through. I had to grow up super-fast. You never know what you’re going to get with a parent who is an addict. It’s like walking on eggshells. It’s the worst feeling because it causes families to tear apart and creates so much chaos. Kids don’t know how to deal with it, and many like me keep quiet and just wonder why me? It’s a horrible, empty feeling to see everything crumbling down as a child because there is nothing you can do while your mom or dad is numbing the pain. You just sit there in silence wondering what it is like to have a normal life.

I have a little brother who I’m very attached to. I took on the role of watching him like a lot of other kids do. To this day, he is the reason I never gave up. My mom and I weren’t always close. When my mom started losing everything, I still stuck by her side for many reasons. I have believed and pushed hope one day she’d realize this isn’t what life is about. The constant moving and car rides is unfair to do to any child because it’s your choices not theirs. Looking down a dark tunnel is how to describe it in a way. It’s so hard to have no control over it.

One day, when it all came back around, my dad had taken me from my mom and my life changed in an instant. Although I wasn’t happy with my mom, I still loved her. It is so hard to not love the person who took you into this world. I will never forget the first time I saw her after. I had so many emotions and I was nervous. She was so happy to see me and looked like better in a sort. I was only allowed to see her once a week. No spending the night or any longer than a full day and I will admit at first I was over it. But slowly she gained my trust back and started to bond with me again. Once she got me to see my brother, it was the best. She had started changing because ¬¬she put me before seeing her son. She started proving to me that she was trying to mend the wall I had up. My dad was also very supportive of me and I’m glad he was there as well.

Now, I live with my mom and we’re basically the same person and are very close. I tell her everything, and love to get mani-pedi’s together or go out to eat. She has my trust 100 percent. How? It took a while, but in the end it was worth it. Never give up. There is always light at the end. My mom went from one day a week, to me living with her. After the many hardships and tears, it all worked out. There has to be rainy days to enjoy the good ones. Congrats on graduating Mom; I love you: and congrats to everyone else here today too. Mom, I’m so glad of how close we are, and how we’re the same person.

The young lady who wrote this letter inspired an entire specialty graduating class when she read it at a graduation. She hopes to go on to be a counselor and gave her permission to share it to inspire others.

Specialty courts solve issues through a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement and the mental health/social service/treatment professionals. All work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens. The next specialty court graduation is scheduled for April 3 at 2 p.m. in the jury services room at the Regional Justice Center.

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