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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Monthly Archives: August 2018

JuryBox

Former jurors, who have recently served in the Nevada federal or state court, are sought for a panel on Sept. 5, from noon to 1:30 p.m., at the Lloyd D. George U.S. Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, to give input on how to improve the jury system. The participants will be provided lunch compliments of the New York University’s Civil Jury Project and the Clark County Bar Association.

Former jurors who have recently served in the Nevada federal or state court and would like to participate in the panel can RSVP to rlJolly@nyu.edu or (562) 304-6364 to attend. Lunch will be provided. Transportation and parking expenses will be reimbursed.

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Former jurors, who have recently served in the Nevada federal or state court, are sought for a panel on Sept. 5, from noon to 1:30 p.m., at the Lloyd D. George U.S. Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, to give input on how to improve the jury system. The participants will be provided lunch compliments of the New York University’s Civil Jury Project and the Clark County Bar Association.

Former jurors who have recently served in the Nevada federal or state court and would like to participate in the panel can RSVP to kv20@nyu.edu or (212) 729-2016 to attend. Lunch will be provided. Transportation and parking expenses will be reimbursed.

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Former jurors, who have recently served in the Nevada federal or state court, are sought for a panel on Sept. 5, from noon to 1:30 p.m., at the Lloyd D. George U.S. Courthouse, Jury Assembly Room, to give input on how to improve the jury system. The participants will be provided lunch compliments of the New York University’s Civil Jury Project and the Clark County Bar Association.

Legal experts note there is a historic decline in the number of civil jury trials, both at the state and federal level. The luncheon is a forum to learn from the former jurors how jury duty can be improved based upon their first hand observations. The former jurors, along with judges, will have the opportunity to share experiences and insight gained, and to provide input on proposals to make jury trials more efficient. Steve Susman the Executive Director of the Civil Jury Project at NYU School of Law will present information on national trends uncovered by The Civil Jury Project. Attorneys are invited to observe the session for Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit through the Clark County Bar Association.

The Civil Jury Project is the only academic center in the country dedicated exclusively to studying civil jury trials. Their goal is to find out why jury trials are vanishing, whether this is a bad thing, and, if so, what can be done to avoid their extinction. The juror luncheon is part of the national study that includes more than 260 state and federal judges from around the country, legal professionals and academics.

Eighth Judicial District Court Judge Timothy Williams, who has been involved in The Civil Jury Project, called juries “the great regulator.” “Juries are important for one basic reason, under our United States Constitution there are guarantees of jury trials in both civil and criminal matters. As a result, the process cannot function unless our citizens are willing to participate,” said Judge Williams. “There is a two-prong reason for them to participate: number one, it’s a duty to do so as citizens of this country; and, it’s a great service provided to the community.”

Judge Williams has been instrumental in conducting this jury input project and said, “Participation of jurors that have served is vital. I’m hoping they can share their stories and experiences and give the courts, lawyers and justice system insight on how we can improve their service and their experience when they serve on a jury.” He acknowledged that when citizens receive a summons they generally don’t want to serve; but, once they serve, they realize that their vote and their service to the community really matter.

Last year, former Eighth Judicial District Chief Judge Elizabeth Gonzalez appointed a Jury Services Committee chaired by Judge Williams and Judge Valerie Adair, and comprised of members of the bar, legislators, the community and the jury commissioner. The committee has made progress in their examination of the jury process from summons through discharge and in their exploration of the viability of further operational and technological improvements that could enhance jury service processes.

Former jurors who have recently served in the Nevada federal or state court and would like to participate in the panel can RSVP to kv20@nyu.edu or (212) 729-2016 to attend. Lunch will be provided. Transportation and parking expenses will be reimbursed.

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Judge Joe Hardy issued an Order in the background check case brought by Dale Zusi, Vicki Delatorre and Sydney Gordon against Governor Brian Sandoval and Attorney General Adam Laxalt.

Link to Order A762975 ZusiVSandoval

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The Howard D. McKibben Chapter of the American Inns of Court has been awarded the Achieving Excellence Platinum designation for the 2017-2018 Inn year. The platinum designation is the highest award presented by the American Inns of Court. To be considered for platinum status, Inns must master specific areas related to the purpose of the respected legal organization including: program development, mentoring and outreach activities. A select group of chapters attain this designation each year.

The Inn  promotes civility, ethics, and professionalism through continuing legal education (CLE) programs and mentoring. Meetings in Las Vegas are held on the second Tuesday of the month between September and June. Law students and attorneys interested in applying for membership are encouraged to contact Andrew Craner at nvesq@cox.net to request an application. The deadline for submission of new member applications is August 31, 2018.

The Howard D. McKibben Chapter of the American Inn of Court was founded in 1986 and was the 24th chapter to receive a charter. The Inn is named for its founding President, the  Honorable Howard D. McKibben (Sr. Judge).

Upcoming meeting dates at Regional Justice Center (RJC) and the Lloyd D. George Courthouse (LDG)

  • Oct.  9 Social  & new member orientation (RJC)
  • Nov. 13 Federal Admission Ceremony/program  (LDG)
  • Dec. 11 Social &  community service project (RJC)
  • Feb. 12  (LDG)
  • March 12  (LDG)
  • April 9 (LDG)
  • May 14 (LDG)
  • June 11 End of Year Dinner Location TBD

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The monthly celebration to mark graduations from intensive specialty court treatment programs had 51 participants cross the finish line to start their lifelong process to be substance-abuse free. The graduations spread a positive ripple-effect through the people in their families and the community. Their families now have a loved one who is contributing instead of disrupting their lives. The community as whole will also benefit from this group of people committed to a better life. At an estimated jail cost of $135 per-day per-inmate, 51 successful graduates will save more than $2.5 million a year in incarceration costs alone. The social benefits are immeasurable from those who want to contribute to the community instead of disrupt. The graduating class includes participants from veterans’ court, mental health court, the OPEN program, drug court and felony DUI court.

Six veterans were part of the large August graduating class. They were wrapped in beautiful quilts specially made by the Quilts of Valor non-profit organization to give them comfort and remind them that their service is appreciated.

Specialty courts solve issues through a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement, court program coordinators and mental health/social service/treatment professionals. All work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens. The National Association of Drug Court Professionals reports: “nationwide, 75 percent of drug court graduates remain arrest-free at least two years after leaving the program. Drug courts reduce crime as much as 35 percent more than other sentencing options.”

The Eighth Judicial District Specialty Courts were recently awarded a grant of $1million from the Substance Abuse Prevention Treatment Agency (SAPTA) to provide sober living and residential treatment placements for individuals in the Clark County Detention Center (CCDC). The SAPTA Grant provides funding for sober living facilities and residential bed infrastructure in Clark County to reduce the average number of days jailed drug court candidates spend waiting for residential placement. Drug court participants have significantly higher rates of success in programs that offer a continuum of care for substance abuse treatment with residential treatment and sober living. That success reduces the burdens on the jail, the justice system and the community as a whole. In FY 2018, 111 participants were provided residential treatment and 189 were provided supportive sober living, with 162 participants obtaining employment.

The Quilts of Valor Foundation was founded in 2003, by Blue Star mom Catherine Roberts from her sewing room. Blue Star moms are those who have a son or daughter in active service. Her son Nathanael’s deployment to Iraq served as the initial inspiration for the foundation. That has since presented thousands of quilts nationwide to those who have served our country.

The local chapter of Quilts of Valor meets the second Friday of the month at 8670 W. Cheyenne Ave. from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in room 105. Volunteers are always welcome; no quilting experience is necessary. For more information call 702-357-0377.

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Mark your calendar for an orientation this Wednesday, Aug. 15 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. for an opportunity to achieve fulfillment an inner beauty as you step into the role of a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA). CASA volunteers speak up for children who need a voice.Those who have volunteered for the program share experiences of deep fulfillment and learning through helping children. There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court.

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

CASA orientations are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit WWW.CASALASVEGAS.ORG or Facebook at WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/#!/CASALASVEGAS. After the Aug. 15 orientation, the next CASA orientation will be held on Sept. 19 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy.

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