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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Monthly Archives: April 2018

Goldilocks has landed in court several times on charges surrounding what appears to be her penchant for breaking into bears homes and stealing porridge. This time, a jury of her peers wasn’t charmed by her innocent smile or persuaded by her creative excuses. They found her guilty of trespassing and theft in a mock trial in Judge Linda Marquis’ courtroom at the Family Division of District Court. It was part of the Take Your Kids to Work Day events open to students who wanted to participate. Three junior judges sentenced the fairy-tale sweetheart to a one-month grounding with no electronic devices. Judge Marquis, the Public defenders Office, the District Attorney’s Office and attorneys took part in the mock trial to teach children about the justice system.

 

 

 

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The Nevada Supreme Court issued a ruling today on the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department emergency motion for a stay, pending appeal, enforcement of the district court’s March 2 and March 9, 2018 orders that granted public records applications, requiring LVMPD to make public record information from 1 October available to the media. Below is a link to the Nevada Supreme Court ruling.

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The Eighth Judicial District Court, Family Division is now accepting applications from attorneys interested in serving as pro tem hearing masters in domestic violence/TPO, child support/paternity, juvenile delinquency, and discovery courts. This recruitment occurs on a regular basis to ensure that there are trained attorneys available to assist the Court in these roles.

All interested attorneys are required to submit an application regardless of whether they have previously served as a pro tem hearing master. Applications from interested attorneys are due on or before May 18, 2018 by 5 p.m. 2016 PRO TEM APPLICATION FORM

 Attorneys who apply should be aware that specific training will be required of any who are selected, prior to sitting as a pro tem hearing master. They should also be aware of opinions of the Standing Committee on Judicial Ethics and Election Practices which would affect them, including Opinions JE99-004 and JE 04-003.

Attorneys who are interested in applying for the first time or in continuing as a pro tem should contact Nikki Gross at grossn@clarkcountycourts.us or 702-455-4622 to receive an application.

Following the due date, applications will be reviewed and selections made.  It is possible that more individuals than the number necessary will apply. Thus, applicants will be notified whether they have been accepted and, if accepted, when their training will occur.

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Two classes of third graders from the Las Vegas Day School held mock trials in Judge Jennifer Togliatti’s courtroom. The first class put fairy-tale sweetheart Goldilocks on trial for bad manners. Junior attorneys called witnesses including the entire Bear family and presented evidence including Baby Bear’s broken chair. A jury of her peers took copious notes, deliberated and found the accused guilty. Goldilocks was cuffed.

The second class heard the case against the Big Bad Wolf, who now goes by B. B. Wolf. An expert witness and others testified against the wolf who claimed he was just paying a visit to a friend.

The mock trials are a fun way for young students to learn about the justice system and get a feel for legal careers.

 

 

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Nevada Supreme Court Justice Michael A. Cherry and Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court Discovery Commissioner Bonnie A. Bulla, have been selected as recipients of the 2018 Liberty Bell Award. They will receive the awards on April 28 at 9:30 a.m., at the Historic Fifth Street School, 401 S. 4th St., at the Las Vegas replica of the Liberty Bell at Centennial Plaza.

The Annual Liberty Bell Award, a partnership between the Clark County Law Foundation’s Let Freedom Ring Committee and the City of Las Vegas, has been recognizing and honoring outstanding citizens since 1983. The award recognizes individuals in the community who uphold the rule of law, contribute to good government within the community, stimulate a sense of civic responsibility, and encourage respect for the law in the courts.

Associate Chief Justice Michael A. Cherry has been an attorney in Nevada since 1970 and was elected to the Supreme Court in 2006. He ran unopposed for a second 6-year term in November of 2012, when he served as Chief Justice for the Nevada Supreme Court. He also served as Chief Justice in 2017. Associate Chief Justice Cherry chairs the Indigent Defense Commission that examines how the justice system deals with criminal defendants who cannot hire their own attorneys. He also chairs the Right to Counsel Legislative Commission and is the supervising justice over the Senior Justice and Judge Program.

Bonnie A. Bulla was appointed Discovery Commissioner to the Eighth Judicial District Court in January 2007. Commissioner Bulla has been an active member of the legal community including work with the American Bar Association where she served as Speaker of the Young Lawyers Division. She was a past president of the Southern Nevada Association of Women Attorneys. She has also been a member of the Nevada Trial Lawyers Association, now known as the Nevada Justice Association, the American Trial Lawyers Association and the Defense Research Institute.

Congratulations to both winners for the recognition.

The Clark County Law Foundation is dedicated to providing community service programs throughout Southern Nevada that are integrated with law-related education.

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Seventeen new CASA volunteers have opened their hearts to children who have endured abuse and neglect. The volunteers took an oath to speak on behalf of  kids. The volunteers, including a tax specialist, teacher, chiropractor, hairdresser and former foster parent will serve as a voice for the young children whose parents are working through addiction and other issues. Three CASA volunteers were also recognized for their volunteer work to help children.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community, who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Those who want to help abused and neglected children are invited to one of the upcoming CASA orientations, which are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas. The next CASA orientation will be held on May 16 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central  Pkwy.

There are around 350 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for children under the supervision of the Family Court CASA Program. However, many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the remainder of the children in care. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them.

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News headlines depict a student body facing unprecedented challenges and trauma.  The Establishing Trauma Informed Schools Summit that was held April 13 offered training to Clark County School District (CCSD) and charter school personnel, staff and teachers, as well as law enforcement and court personnel to effectively handle suicide prevention, counter violence and extremism, serve as a trusted adult, recognize risk factors of those who may be suicidal and to handle the aftermath appropriately.

More than 250 attended the summit that featured speakers including:  Eighth Judicial District Court Judge William Voy,  Richard Egan, Office of Suicide Prevention, Denise Parker, Department of Family Services, Richard Egan, Office of Suicide Prevention, Cesar Lemos, Director/Department of Juvenile Justice, Jae Beasley, Federal Bureau of Investigations, and Joe Roberts, CCSD Threat Assessments.

It is recognized that trauma affects brain development, the body, behaviors, thinking, self-concept and relationships. Research indicates that one out of every four children attending school has been exposed to a traumatic event that can affect learning and/or behavior. The goal with trauma-informed schools is to help children feel safe so they can learn. The idea is that social and emotional well being have to be addressed to remove stress and facilitate the learning process.

Attendees were given information and tools including:

A first-responders’ checklist.

Children’s responses to traumatic incidences.

Development stages affect how children interpret their fear and how they experience traumatic reaction to death.

Developmental Issues of Grieving Children and How to Help.

The summit was hosted by: the Office of Suicide Prevention, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department , the Eighth Judicial District Court , the Clark County School District  and the Charter School Association of Nevada.

 

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