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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Monthly Archives: October 2018

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The Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court in Las Vegas is accepting employment applications for specialty court specialist. Applications will be accepted until Nov. 9, 2018 until 5:01 p.m.

The minimum requirements include a master’s degree in behavior sciences or a related field and two years of full-time experience in the direct provision of substance abuse and/or mental health treatment services.

Applicants must possess a valid Nevada Class C driver’s license at time of appointment. Must possess a valid license or internship as LCADC, LCSW, LPC or MFT in the State of Nevada.

If interested, please CLICK HERE to visit the Clark County website to apply.

Specialty courts solve issues through a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement and mental health/social service/treatment professionals. All work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens.

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The Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court (EJDC) has been awarded an $381,551 U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) Office of Justice Programs grant for mental health court (MHC). The court applied to the Justice Department for the grant to employ an improved strategy in the MHC that focuses on justice involved adults in Clark County who are severely and persistently mentally ill; the majority of whom are also diagnosed with co-occurring disorders including substance abuse. Individuals with serious mental illness routinely have multiple contacts with local hospitals, jails, and prisons and end up costing taxpayers significant dollars as a result of their repeated contact with those institutions.

The EJDC MHC provides intensive treatment and will use the DOJ grant funding to implement an actuarial, gender-responsive criminogenic risk/need assessment to tailor the services and supervision for mental health court participants according to their needs. The grant will fund implementation of capacity analysis, training on the implementation of the Women’s Risk Needs Assessment and the adoption of cognitive-behavioral, gender-responsive programming.

“This funding provides resources to do risk/needs assessments to improve intervention strategies, case planning and resource management,” said Judge Elizabeth Gonzalez, who presides over the Mental Health Court. “Our goal is to reduce recidivism and facilitate positive outcomes for  Mental Health Court participants through data driven implementation of correctional rehabilitation and case planning.”

“The Department of Justice grant gives mental health court tools to improve the effectiveness of treatment aimed at preventing participants from revolving through the justice system,” said District Court Chief Judge Linda Marie Bell. “The Justice Department’s commitment to funding the mental health court validates the positive  results of treatment, versus a return of those with mental illness to the streets after incarceration with no help and the significant likelihood that they will re-offend.”

The Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court specialty courts are an effective way to address root-causes that lead to recidivism. The specialty courts include veterans court, mental health court, the OPEN program, drug court, felony DUI court, family treatment drug court, juvenile drug court and autism court. The court  is in the process of beginning a gambling treatment diversion court.

 

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Professionals in academics, gaming, tech, the military an other walks of life will add richness to their lives when they take an oath as CASA volunteers on Monday, Oct. 29 at noon at Family Court, Courtroom 9, 601 N. Pecos Road.

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The volunteers speak on behalf of children in foster care who have endured abuse and neglect. The give input in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community, who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Those who want to help abused and neglected children are invited to one of the upcoming CASA orientations, which are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas. Due to the Thanksgiving holiday the next CASA orientation will be held on Nov. 14 at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy.

“Children who have endured abuse and neglect are traumatized. They need stability in their life and someone to speak up for them to communicate what is in their best interest,” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan, who will administer the oath to the CASA volunteers. “CASAs bring a much needed voice stability. They give judges a picture of what’s going on with a child and they offer the children consistency.”

There are around 329 CASA volunteers serving as a voice for children under the supervision of the Family Court CASA Program. Many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the remainder of the children in care. Last year, nearly one thousand children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, deal with school challenges and handle home life.

“Volunteering to help these children in need is a tangible way to make a difference and have a huge impact on the life of a child,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Bryce Duckworth. “The need is big and the feeling of reward is great.”

“You’ll never do anything that will be more fulfilling than being a CASA,” said Carolyn Muscari, A 37-year CASA volunteer. “It’s the best paying job I ever had, and I never made a cent. I get paid in satisfaction. You can make a difference and it makes you feel good.”

 

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Those who want to make a difference should consider volunteering to be a voice for kids as a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA).

A CASA orientation will be held Oct. 17, 6 p.m. at the Clark County Govt. Center 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy.

There is a big need for CASA volunteers in Clark County to speak up for the approximately 3,200 children in the community, who are receiving services under supervision of Family Court. CASA volunteers represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them.

CASA orientations are held the third Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. More information is available about the program at 702-455-4306, visit www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas.

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The Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court (EJDC) has been awarded an $874,097 U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs grant for Family Treatment Drug Court inpatient treatment and housing with intensive outpatient treatment. The court applied to the Justice Department for the much needed funding that will break down to approximately $291,365 a year. The grant will cover 13 residential beds and 13 housing slots with intensive outpatient treatment each year until Sept. 30, 2021. The funding will help to meet the court goal to improve outcomes through enhanced wraparound services to reunify families, increase parent treatment engagement and retention, decrease substance abuse and improve family functioning. The surge of opioid abuse has overwhelmed child welfare systems across the county and in our community.

“This Department of Justice grant is greatly needed and appreciated. The funding will go to address the crisis-level need in the Family Treatment Drug Court for housing and wraparound services,” said District Court Chief Judge Linda Marie Bell. “Each family that achieves a successful outcome as a result of this funding will create a positive ripple effect for their children and the community.”

The District Court Family Treatment Drug Court program is a voluntary program. Parents are typically referred to the program by their Department of Family Services (DFS) case manager and/or the judge presiding over their case. Participation in the program involves either a written referral from the DFS case manager, and/or parental request to start the program.

“Every day in court, we see the toll drugs take on families. Parental addiction as a contributing factor for removal of children is a growing issue,” said Judge Frank Sullivan who presides over the Family Treatment Drug Court. “This much needed funding gives us the ability to keep families intact as parents get the treatment and services they need to recover and care for their children.”

Family Treatment Drug Court has four phases or milestones to assist the parent in working through the complex issues of their addiction and co-occurring disorders in a meaningful and manageable way. Incentives and sanctions are used to achieve success. Parents are typically required to attend court weekly in the initial stages of treatment. Drug and alcohol testing provides an accurate, timely and comprehensive assessment of substance use and treatment progress by participants. The judge is provided updates on treatment attendance and progress, drug test results, and overall case status/progress.

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Don’t miss the October 9 Civil Bench Bar Meeting from noon to 1 p.m. in courtroom 10D of the Regional Justice Center for a free, frightfully good continuing legal education (CLE). The State Bar of Nevada  Office of Bar Counsel will do a half credit CLE on Governance of the Profession with speaker Daniel Hooge (CLE sign in sheet will be provided at luncheon).

Judge Nancy Allf will also demystify interpleaders.

October is Pro Bono Month and Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada will share tricks of the trade for tapping the treats that go with volunteering to take a pro bono case.

Lunch is limited to the first 60 attendee. Get there before it disappears.

Civil Bench Bar meetings offer members of the bar the latest news from District Court, a forum to get questions addressed and a chance to grab a quick bite to eat while networking.

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The 1October healing garden at 1015 S. Casino Center Blvd. in downtown Las Vegas serves as a beautiful reminder of those deeply loved and lost.

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