Skip to content

eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Tag Archives: Judge Jennifer Elliot

Judge Jennifer Elliot has been presiding over the dependency mothers’ drug court since 2008. It is a program that has helped to get many mothers away from the clutches of addiction and into the arms of their children. This week, three more moms graduated from the program.  That’s a handful of kids who won’t have to be in foster care; who won’t have to wonder where mom is; and who will have someone who loves them and deeply cares for them.

In front of others going through the program, Judge Elliot asked each of the graduates how they felt upon graduation. She said, “Nobody knows what the journey is going to look like when they start out, and I want others to hear how to be successful at it.” The moms graduating lit up when given the opportunity to share how they felt. One mom said, “I’m very, very happy where I am and how far I’ve come.  It’s amazing being able to be with my son, sober; to watch him grow and remember that.” Judge Elliot told each of the graduates that she was very proud of them. She also offered a word of advice to a father with one of the graduating moms, who has his own struggles. She said, “Setback doesn’t mean failure, it just means you just have to keep on keeping on.”

Judge Elliot is turning over the administration of the dependency mothers’ drug court to Judge Frank Sullivan who handles abuse and neglect cases. She told those in court that Judge Sullivan would ensure that the program would continue to be successful. Judge Sullivan responded, “No one can replace Judge Elliot.” Program participants gave Judge Elliot a giant farewell card. The judge who launched the specialty court aimed at helping moms with addiction won’t be managing the day-to-day of the program, but the legacy of what she accomplished since 2008 will carry on for generations.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Children from three families will now have the most important person in the world back in their lives, after two mothers and one father recently graduated from the Eighth Judicial District mothers’/fathers’ specialty court. All three completed a rigorous in-patient treatment program, that involved spending between six and 12 months in the WestCare treatment facility learning a new way of life.

The graduation was attended by Judge Jennifer Elliot who presides over the Dependency Mothers’ Drug Court, the treatment providers, specialty court staff and fellow specialty court participants. The fellow drug court participants got to see how successful recovery looks. They got to witness someone in a situation much like their own, turn their life around, have their children in their lives in a meaningful way, and leave drugs and crime behind.

When judges enter a courtroom, all rise as a sign of respect. Judge Elliot and the courtroom gallery all rise when participants graduate from the mothers’/fathers’ specialty court. The children of the graduates now have the person who loves them, the way only a parent can, back in their lives making them dinner, helping with homework, giving them love, and being part of their dreams. Their families and our community are better for it.

Since 1992, the Eighth Judicial District Court has been responding to the emerging social issues of addiction and mental health by establishing specialty courts. Each day, the court handles cases on the many crimes committed by people addicted to illegal drugs or suffering from mental illness. The Dependency Mothers’ Drug Court  is a partnership between Nevada’s Division of Child and Family Services, Clark County Department of Family Services, Clark County Specialty Courts and WestCare of Southern Nevada. Components that make the program work are early intervention services, coordinated clinical assessment, coordinated case management, program referral, residential treatment services including reunification services, parenting skills education, outpatient support services, staff training support and client transportation.

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Huge sparkling diamonds and words of praise were given to Truancy Diversion Program (TDP) volunteers who visit schools and motivate kids to get in the classroom, on track to graduate and on the path to success in life.  The diamonds weren’t real, they were awards, but they conveyed the immense appreciation for the volunteers; many of whom got up and expressed tremendous pride for the program that is changing young lives for the better.

The volunteers, who are judges, attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers, spend approximately three hours each week to hold truancy court at schools, where they meet individually with students and their parents. They get to the heart of why the students are struggling and clear a path to help them get to school and make the grade. The volunteers know they are making a difference through motivation; they know they are getting through to the kids on the importance of their education.

Volunteers review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to 80 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all Clark County schools have a TDP program.

The TDP was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002. Since 2007, the program has been overseen by District Court Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the Clark County School District. Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

Licensed attorneys, mental health professionals or law enforcement officers interested in volunteering as a TDP judge can call 702-455-1755.

Tags: , , , , , ,

Professionals looking for something fulfilling  in their life are invited to spend a few hours a week motivating struggling students. The Truancy Diversion Project (TDP) aimed at improving student school attendance and success in classes is calling on attorneys, law enforcement and social service professionals to be volunteer judges at area schools. Volunteers are asked to visit their chosen school once a week to meet with and motivate students to achieve success. Those who are interested in volunteering as a Truancy Diversion Judge, can contact DeDe Parker at702-455-1755.

On Sept. 2 TDP held all-day “trauma-informed” kickoff training for volunteer judges at Family Court with approximately 50 participants. The purpose of the TDP is to utilize a specialty court model to assist the Clark County School District (CCSD) to reduce absenteeism, re-engage students in learning and to cut the dropout rate.

Clark County School District reported nearly 244,000 truant children for school-year 2015-2016. Teenage pregnancy, truancy, and high school dropout rates in Nevada are alarming. Individuals lacking a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the negative consequences associated with it. The TDP is a collaborative effort between the Family Court and CCSD designed to prevent and reduce youth crime, to re-engage our youth in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems.

The Truancy Diversion Program (TDP) is a partnership between Family Court and CCSD. TDP is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families. Since 2007, the program has been overseen by Eighth Judicial District Family Court Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the Clark County School District.

“The research on truancy has shown attendance and behavior problems at school are risk factors for drug/alcohol use and for involvement in juvenile justice system,” said Judge Jennifer Elliott. “Truancy Diversion volunteers effectively work directly with the students to address their challenges and motivate them to go to school, graduate and move on to a productive future. The Truancy Diversion Program doesn’t just benefit these students, but it benefits our community as a whole. Higher graduation rates lead to a stronger and more employable community,” said Judge Elliott. “Volunteering to serve as a judge with the TDP is worthwhile work. Our young students gain so much from the guidance provided by the volunteers in this program.”

The volunteer TDP judges are licensed attorneys, mental health professionals, law enforcement personnel, another qualified professionals who commit to a school year of weekly court sessions that promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to 85 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court, Family Division is to continue to expand until all 357 Clark County schools have a TDP specialty court.

“The Truancy Diversion program helps young people achieve success in education. That success sets the stage for the rest of their lives.” said Presiding Family Court Judge Charles Hoskin. “I urge attorneys in our community to be a part of this program to help young people in our community achieve.”

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

 

Blue Diamond awards were presented to Truancy Diversion Program volunteer judges at a recognition event for those who are helping to keep Clark County students in school and on track to graduate. The volunteers work with the students weekly to help them transition from diamonds in the rough to brilliant young graduates.

Clark County reported over 240,000 truant children for school-year 2014-2015. Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the Clark County School District has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

The TDP was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002. Since 2007, the program has been overseen by District Court Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the CCSD.  Judges, attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers volunteer approximately three hours each week to and hold truancy court sessions at schools, where they meet individually with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to 80 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all Clark County schools have a TDP program.

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional or law enforcement officer and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program please contact DeDe Parker at: 702-321-2410.The Family Court youth programs are a great example of how the Eighth Judicial District Court is using alternative, efficient methods to address crime and ensure justice. District Court continuously works to develop innovative ideas, improve efficiencies, address issues and improve access to justice.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 

Truancy Diversion Program (TDP) volunteers who commit to a school-year of weekly truancy diversion court sessions on a Clark County School District (CCSD) campus will be recognized on Friday, May 27 at 5:30 p.m. to be held at the Sam’s Town Hotel and Gambling Hall in the Ponderosa Ballroom at 5111 Boulder Hwy. Each of the volunteers will be given an award and the opportunity to share their experience with clearing the way for students to walk on graduation day.

The TDP was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002. Since 2007, the program has been overseen by District Court Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the CCSD. “The volunteer Truancy Diversion Judges are playing an important role in addressing the significant issue of truancy in Clark County. They listen to the kids, hear their issues, encourage and motivate them. They clear a path for the students to graduate and have the opportunity for college or a career,” said Judge Elliott. “The attorneys and other professionals who volunteer as judges find it very rewarding to help these students get on track to graduate. I invite attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers to be part of the solution to the significant problem of truancy in our schools.”

Clark County reported over 240,000 truant children for school-year 2014-2015.Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

Judges, attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers volunteer approximately three hours each week to and hold truancy court sessions at schools, where they meet individually with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to 80 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all Clark County schools have a TDP program.

“The Truancy Diversion volunteers, along with Judge Elliott and her team, have accomplished much to fill some of the gaps to get students struggling with attendance on track and in school,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Charles Hoskin. “Their efforts are making a difference in the lives of young people and improving their chances for success.”

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional or law enforcement officer and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program please contact DeDe Parker at: 702-321-2410.The Family Court youth programs are a great example of how the Eighth Judicial District Court is using alternative, efficient methods to address crime and ensure justice. District Court continuously works to develop innovative ideas, improve efficiencies, address issues and improve access to justice.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Attorneys, mental health professionals, law enforcement officers, retired teachers and other qualified applicants are invited to join the movement to improve graduation rates in Clark County. The Truancy Diversion Program (TDP) is looking to expand its successful program and needs volunteers to serve as school judges to meet with kids, guide them toward available resources and motivate the students.

The TDP was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002. Since 2007, the program has been overseen by District Court Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the Clark County School District (CCSD).

“I invite attorneys, mental health professionals, law enforcement officers and retired teachers to be part of the solution to the significant problem of truancy in our schools,” said Judge Elliott. “The volunteer judges are guiding struggling students toward solutions and motivating them to graduate so they have future opportunities for college or a career.”

Clark County reported over 240,000 truant children for school-year 2014-2015.Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

Judges, attorneys and other qualified applicants volunteer approximately two hours each week and hold truancy court sessions at schools where they meet individually with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to over 80 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all 336 Clark County schools have a TDP program. In 2014, the TDP was one of four programs in the nation to receive a $600,000 grant from the Department of Justice designed to keep kids in school and out of court.

“I encourage those in the legal profession who are looking to do something meaningful in the community to consider being a truancy diversion judge,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Charles Hoskin. “Those who have volunteered report being very gratified at the positive influence they have had on struggling youth.”

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional, law enforcement officer, retired teacher or other qualified applicant and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program, please contact DeNeese Parker at 702-321-2410 or Deneesep@gmail.com and/or Kimberly Alexander at 702-455-1755 or Alexanderk@clarkcountycourts.us.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,