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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Tag Archives: Judge Linda Marquis

Goldilocks has landed in court several times on charges surrounding what appears to be her penchant for breaking into bears homes and stealing porridge. This time, a jury of her peers wasn’t charmed by her innocent smile or persuaded by her creative excuses. They found her guilty of trespassing and theft in a mock trial in Judge Linda Marquis’ courtroom at the Family Division of District Court. It was part of the Take Your Kids to Work Day events open to students who wanted to participate. Three junior judges sentenced the fairy-tale sweetheart to a one-month grounding with no electronic devices. Judge Marquis, the Public defenders Office, the District Attorney’s Office and attorneys took part in the mock trial to teach children about the justice system.

 

 

 

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Judge Kathleen Delaney had a fifth grade class from St. Viator’s sit in on her calendar. After watching the wheels of justice turn in the courtroom, the wheels in the students’ minds were turning. They asked the judge some very thoughtful questions. One student got a big laugh when he asked the judge if she ever got frustrated with what happens in court.

Students from the UNLV William S. Boyd School of Law spent part of their spring break in an alternative program where they learn about the practice of law and the courts. They sat in on court, attended a judges meeting and got some Q&A time in with the judges.

District Court is involved in a number of initiatives to educate students about the justice system.

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An army of volunteers descended on Cashman Center on Nov. 14 to provide services to thousands of Valley homeless at Project Homeless Connect. The Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division set up a court on-site. Judge Linda Marquis set sixty-day hearings and quashed warrants for 28 cases with homeless parents who had fallen behind on child-support payments and needed time to get their finances in order. The court Information Technology Division created automated Orders specific to Project Homeless Connect and set up the makeshift courtroom at Cashman.

“This event was a big undertaking. Although it was District Court’s first year participating in this annual event, we made a huge impact,” said District Court Judge Linda Marquis, who presided over the hearings at the event. “I am proud of the District Court team that set up and supported the infrastructure that enabled us to hand litigants signed, file-stamped orders that quashed warrants and set return dates. The signed orders served as proof the litigants’ warrants had been quashed.  Those Orders enabled them to qualify for services from providers on-site.“

“Having a warrant is a roadblock to getting a job, finding a place to live or accomplishing other basics that help people live productive lives,” said Judge Charles Hoskin, who presides over the Family Division. “Judge Marquis spearheaded District Court participation in Project Homeless Connect to help give homeless parents an opportunity to turn things around. Judge Marquis’ work and commitment on this event are appreciated.”

Project Homeless Connect (PHC) is an annual service and resource event for those experiencing homelessness or those who are at-risk of becoming homeless. The intent is to bring needed services in one, easily accessed location to help individuals overcome barriers to housing and self–sufficiency.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Second graders from Merryhill Elementary School approached the case of State of Nevada vs. Goldilocks as if they were seasoned justice professionals. The mini attorneys litigated the case in which the golden girl was charged with robbery, theft and trespassing before a panel of three judges, including real District Court Judge Linda Marquis. Judge Marquis sponsored the mock trial for the young legal eagles to give them a hands-on lesson on the justice system. The students clearly got the message and nailed the verdict. They found the blonde defendant guilty of trespassing and theft, but not guilty of robbery. After their efforts, the second graders, who played roles ranging from judge and attorney to journalist and jurors, were rewarded with a treat and a certificate. The attorney fees were a lot cheaper than the real lawyers they played. Give them a few years.

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