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Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Tag Archives: Quilts of Valor Las Vegas

A chili cook-off lunch raised just over $500 for supplies to make Quilts of Valor. The Las Vegas Chapter of Quilts of Valor has presented thousands of quilts to those who have served our country, including Flights of Honor veterans and veterans who have successfully completed veterans’ court in District Court, Justice Court and the Las Vegas Municipal Court here in our community. Each quilt is lovingly crafted by volunteers to bring the veterans comfort and to let them know that their service is truly appreciated.

Clara Thomas from the District Attorney’s office was crowned the Chili Champ this year. Other winners were District Court Judge Nancy Allf and Glen O’Brien from the District Attorney’s office. He admitted his wife Susan was the real winner, since she made the chili. Clara took home the 2018 champ’s apron, a mini quilt, a Cheesecake Factory gift card and some serious bragging rights. Our other winners took home mini quilts made from Quilts of Valor fabric remnants. Big thanks to the winners and all those who made chili, and to all who joined the chili cook-off fun.

The Quilt of Valor Foundation was founded in 2003, by Blue Star mom Catherine Roberts from her sewing room. Blue Star moms are those who have a son or daughter in active service. Her son Nathanael’s deployment to Iraq served as the initial inspiration for the foundation. That has since presented thousands of quilts nationwide to those who have served our country.

Veterans’ courts are hybrid drug and mental health courts that use the drug court model to serve veterans struggling with addiction, serious mental illness and/or co-occurring disorders. They promote sobriety, recovery and stability through a coordinated response that involves cooperation and collaboration with the traditional partners found in drug and mental health courts and agencies.

The local chapter of Quilt of Valor meets the second Friday of the month at 8670 W. Cheyenne Ave. from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in room 105. Volunteers are always welcome; no quilting experience is necessary. For more information call 702-357-0377.

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The monthly celebration to mark graduations from intensive specialty court treatment programs had 51 participants cross the finish line to start their lifelong process to be substance-abuse free. The graduations spread a positive ripple-effect through the people in their families and the community. Their families now have a loved one who is contributing instead of disrupting their lives. The community as whole will also benefit from this group of people committed to a better life. At an estimated jail cost of $135 per-day per-inmate, 51 successful graduates will save more than $2.5 million a year in incarceration costs alone. The social benefits are immeasurable from those who want to contribute to the community instead of disrupt. The graduating class includes participants from veterans’ court, mental health court, the OPEN program, drug court and felony DUI court.

Six veterans were part of the large August graduating class. They were wrapped in beautiful quilts specially made by the Quilts of Valor non-profit organization to give them comfort and remind them that their service is appreciated.

Specialty courts solve issues through a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement, court program coordinators and mental health/social service/treatment professionals. All work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens. The National Association of Drug Court Professionals reports: “nationwide, 75 percent of drug court graduates remain arrest-free at least two years after leaving the program. Drug courts reduce crime as much as 35 percent more than other sentencing options.”

The Eighth Judicial District Specialty Courts were recently awarded a grant of $1million from the Substance Abuse Prevention Treatment Agency (SAPTA) to provide sober living and residential treatment placements for individuals in the Clark County Detention Center (CCDC). The SAPTA Grant provides funding for sober living facilities and residential bed infrastructure in Clark County to reduce the average number of days jailed drug court candidates spend waiting for residential placement. Drug court participants have significantly higher rates of success in programs that offer a continuum of care for substance abuse treatment with residential treatment and sober living. That success reduces the burdens on the jail, the justice system and the community as a whole. In FY 2018, 111 participants were provided residential treatment and 189 were provided supportive sober living, with 162 participants obtaining employment.

The Quilts of Valor Foundation was founded in 2003, by Blue Star mom Catherine Roberts from her sewing room. Blue Star moms are those who have a son or daughter in active service. Her son Nathanael’s deployment to Iraq served as the initial inspiration for the foundation. That has since presented thousands of quilts nationwide to those who have served our country.

The local chapter of Quilts of Valor meets the second Friday of the month at 8670 W. Cheyenne Ave. from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in room 105. Volunteers are always welcome; no quilting experience is necessary. For more information call 702-357-0377.

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A chili cook-off at the Regional Justice Center raised more than $700. for Quilts of Valor. A check was presented to the Nevada state coordinator for the Quilt of Valor Foundation, Victoria Colburn Hall at a recent Veteran’ Court graduation ceremony. Judge Linda Bell presides over the Veteran’ Court program.

Veterans’ courts are hybrid drug and mental health courts that use the drug court model to serve veterans struggling with addiction, serious mental illness and/or co-occurring disorders. They promote sobriety, recovery and stability through a coordinated response that involves cooperation and collaboration with the traditional partners found in drug and mental health courts and agencies.

Quilts of Valor presents Veterans Court graduates a Quilt of Valor a quilt to comfort them as they build their new lives. Victoria is a Blue Star mom; her son spent 24 year in the Marine Corp assault unit. She awarded two vets at the chili cook-off  Quilts of Valor for their service and gave a brief overview of the foundation.

The cook-off was planned to mark Veterans’ Day. The Quilt of Valor Foundation was founded in 2003, by Blue Star mom Catherine Roberts from her sewing room. Blue Star moms are those who have a son or daughter in active service. Her son Nathanael’s deployment to Iraq served as the initial inspiration for the foundation. That has since presented thousands of quilts nationwide to those who have served our country.

The local chapter of Quilt of Valor meets the second Friday of the month at 8670 W. Cheyenne Ave. from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in room 105. Volunteers are always welcome; no quilting experience is necessary. For more information call 702-357-0377.

 

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A recent graduate of Veterans’ court read a letter to a courtroom full of veterans who are in the process of recovering from addiction and atoning for their entanglements with the law. The new grad made the long, hard trek to recovery with the help of the therapeutic court program.

In the hopes of helping his fellow vets envision their own recovery he shared: ” I entered this program the same way all of us did, it was due to lack of accountability, responsibility and discipline. Addiction is unbiased in its pursuit. Moral deficiency, that is exactly what I thought I had. Believe me when I say I am a very disciplined person with integrity, correct morals and a firm belief in my ethics, boundaries and knowledge of my boundaries; until pain killers entered my life.

The stress of my job, the loss of my friends, the multiple high action and high stress events I’ve been through and almost lost my life while on the job, The things I’ve seen that I cannot unsee and the multiple injuries I sustained during my careers, all did not help and all built up because I did not deal with it appropriately.  Pain killers went from medicating to addiction. It slowly crept in and by the time it hit and grabbed hold, I felt loss and felt trapped.”

He expressed thoughts on his depression and how he hid it. Then he shared,” What I’ve learned is that there are three options you have when adversity or a traumatic event happens to you; you can let it define you, you can let it destroy you or you can let it strengthen you. Understand that mistakes are what you did, they’re not who you are. To help us improve and stay the course you must have an attitude of gratitude, a positive philosophy and a decision making framework that you run all decisions through, as long as you have breath in your lungs and blood in your veins, you can shape your mind and body to be successful, grateful and happy. Stay humble. And stop talking negative about who’s done you wrong and your situation, it just keeps you feeling discouraged and negative. You can’t control the thoughts that pop up in your head, but you have the power to redirect them to happy thoughts or at least calmer thoughts. And start talking more positive, more compassionate and understanding you will feel those positive feelings build and you will have re-wired your brain so that it simply becomes second nature.”

The new veterans’ court graduate challenged his fellow soldiers to thrive and persevere through their recovery and to become happy, successful and grateful. When he concluded his speech, Judge Adriana Escobar, who presides over the veterans’ court, applauded and reminded him to utilize the recovery resources in the community to stay on track. The judge gave him his certificate of completion and a hug, then Victoria Hall wrapped him in a Quilt of Valor to comfort him through any potential dark times ahead in his life-long journey of recovery.

The veteran’s letter can be seen in its entirety here: Veterans’Letter7_5_17

Victoria Hall is a Blue Star mom; her son spent 24 year in the Marine Corp assault unit. The Quilt of Valor Foundation was founded in 2003 by Blue Star mom Catherine Roberts from her sewing room. Blue Star moms are those who have a son or daughter in active service. Her son Nathanael’s deployment to Iraq served as the initial inspiration for the foundation. That has since presented thousands of quilts nationwide to those who have served our country. The local chapter of Quilt of Valor meets the second Friday of the month at 8670 W. Cheyanne Ave. from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in room 105. Volunteers are always welcome; no quilting experience is necessary. For more information call 702-357-0377.

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Scott Shepard is a veteran who ended up in the Eighth Judicial District veterans’ specialty court. He spent a year and a half going through the intensive treatment program and emerged a new and improved man. He stabilized his life, got housing and is moving forward. At his graduation from the program, presiding veterans’ court Judge Adrianna Escobar and the Nevada state coordinator for the Quilt of Valor Foundation, Victoria Colburn Hall were there to wrap him in a beautiful Quilt of Valor. The stunning, patriotic themed quilt was made by volunteers to show honor and give comfort to veterans who have served our country. Judge Escobar commended the Army veteran and said,” We are all very proud of you and you should be very proud of yourself.”

Victoria Hall is a Blue Star mom; her son spent 24 year in the Marine Corp assault unit. She thanked Scott for his service. She said, “It is very near and dear to my heart to say thank you. Every quilt is made with many hands. It is a privilege to serve, honor and comfort.” She gave a brief overview of the foundation. The Quilt of Valor Foundation was founded in 2003 by Blue Star mom Catherine Roberts from her sewing room. Blue Star moms have a son or daughter in active service. Her son Nathanael’s deployment to Iraq served as the initial inspiration for the foundation.

The local chapter of Quilt of Valor meets the second Friday of the month at 8670 W. Cheyanne Ave. from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in room 105. Volunteers are always welcome; no quilting experience is necessary. For more information call 702-357-0377.

Judge Escobar looks to veterans’ court success stories as inspiration for others going through the program. She said, “Veterans’ court graduates are buying houses, finishing college, getting custody of their children. What they are doing, are not the things they would be doing if they were in prison. They are getting the tools they need to be successful which ultimately makes the community much safer.”

Since Sept. 2012, the veterans’ treatment court has helped veterans who are facing criminal charges as a result of substance abuse. Veterans’ court is one of several Eighth Judicial District specialty courts that save millions of tax dollars by averting repeated incarcerations due to substance abuse offenses and related crimes. Specialty courts solve issues through a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement and mental health/social service/treatment professionals. All work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens. The National Association of Drug Court Professionals reports: “nationwide, 75 percent of drug court graduates remain arrest-free at least two years after leaving the program. Drug courts reduce crime as much as 35 percent more than other sentencing options.”

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