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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Tag Archives: Las Vegas FAmily Court

Attorneys, mental health professionals, law enforcement officers, retired teachers and other qualified applicants are invited to join the movement to improve graduation rates in Clark County. The Truancy Diversion Program (TDP) is looking to expand its successful program and needs volunteers to serve as school judges to meet with kids, guide them toward available resources and motivate the students.

The TDP was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002. Since 2007, the program has been overseen by District Court Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the Clark County School District (CCSD).

“I invite attorneys, mental health professionals, law enforcement officers and retired teachers to be part of the solution to the significant problem of truancy in our schools,” said Judge Elliott. “The volunteer judges are guiding struggling students toward solutions and motivating them to graduate so they have future opportunities for college or a career.”

Clark County reported over 240,000 truant children for school-year 2014-2015.Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

Judges, attorneys and other qualified applicants volunteer approximately two hours each week and hold truancy court sessions at schools where they meet individually with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to over 80 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all 336 Clark County schools have a TDP program. In 2014, the TDP was one of four programs in the nation to receive a $600,000 grant from the Department of Justice designed to keep kids in school and out of court.

“I encourage those in the legal profession who are looking to do something meaningful in the community to consider being a truancy diversion judge,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Charles Hoskin. “Those who have volunteered report being very gratified at the positive influence they have had on struggling youth.”

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional, law enforcement officer, retired teacher or other qualified applicant and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program, please contact DeNeese Parker at 702-321-2410 or Deneesep@gmail.com and/or Kimberly Alexander at 702-455-1755 or Alexanderk@clarkcountycourts.us.

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The new school year is in full-swing and it is important that students get the year off to a good start so they can graduate to the next level. The Truancy Diversion Project (TDP) aimed at improving student school attendance and success in classes, is gearing up to provide support with a kickoff event for volunteer judges on Monday, Sept. 28 at 11:30 a.m. in Zenoff Hall behind the Family Court, 601 N. Pecos Road. The event is part pep-rally, part final preparation as the volunteer judges head out to 70 schools across the valley.

The TDP was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002. Since 2007, the program has been overseen by District Court Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the Clark County School District CCSD.

“I am excited to begin another school year of being part of the solution to the significant problem of truancy in our schools,” said Judge Elliott. “The volunteer judges are really making a big difference to help struggling students with issues that are getting in the way of their education and ultimately their success. Our goal is to get these students to graduate so they have future opportunities for college or a career,” said Judge Elliott.

Clark County reported nearly 120,000 truant children for school-year 2013-2014.Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

Judges, attorneys and other qualified applicants volunteering approximately three hours each week to and hold truancy court sessions at schools where they meeting individually with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to 70 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all 358 Clark County schools have a TDP program. In 2014, the TDP was one of four programs in the nation to receive a $600,000 grant from the Department of Justice designed to keep kids in school and out of court.

“It’s impressive to see the growth in the Truancy Diversion Program and to know that more students are being helped reach the goal of graduation.” said Presiding Family Court Judge Charles Hoskin. “Providing guidance and resources for young people to be successful in school helps them to establish a foundation for successful future.”

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional or law enforcement officer and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program please contact DeDe Parker at: 702-321-2410.

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The Eighth Judicial District Court is taking action to implement best practices for guardianship cases as established by the National Association for Court Management. District Court Chief Judge David Barker recently attended an open hearing regarding guardianship at the Clark County Commission. As the chief judge, he is entrusted with the responsibility to handle matters of concern with the court. “Our fundamental responsibility to is to promote citizens trust and confidence in the guardianship process.” said Judge Barker. “I told the County Commission that I wanted to listen and I did. I continue to listen and I have also taken immediate action including establishing a guardianship hotline at 702-671-4614 and an email link guardianshipcompliance@clarkcountycourts.us for those who have concerns. “ Judge Barker sat in on guardianship cases to get a firsthand look as court officers worked. “Sitting in on guardianship cases provided valuable insight,” said Judge Barker. “As part of the fact-finding, I also spoke with those who handle these cases.”

Other action has been taken including:
• Contacting the Second Judicial District Court Chief Judge David Hardy and Nevada Supreme Court Chief Justice James Hardesty to form a high-level Guardianship Commission to review the issues and concerns expressed by the Clark County Commission.
• Contacting nationally recognized experts in guardianship for their expertise, insight and possible involvement with the commission.
• Review of significant correspondence regarding guardianship.
• Meeting with law enforcement and others in the executive branch with an eye toward cooperation that would be consistent with the judicial canons and responsive to community concerns.
• Requesting a guardianship compliance administrator and an investigator as steps to a wider strategy to address a number of important areas including:Formalizing a process for bringing complaints or concerns to the attention of the court. Implementation of a guardianship monitoring program. Promoting court/community collaboration. Developing and institutionalizing training programs for guardians and volunteers who are not professionals. Developing improved standardized procedures, forms and informational resources. Tracking and documenting the number of cases to determine and secure optimum staffing and resources.

The Guardianship Commission will examine policies and procedures currently used and provide recommendations, based on national best practices, on how they can be improved. The court appreciates the County Commission commitment to addressing this important concern and looks forward to their essential support to make the Guardianship Commission recommendations into reality. Adding a guardianship compliance administrator who is experienced in this case type will be a significant step to handling these challenges.

There are volunteer legal organizations in the community that work to assist with guardianship matters. “I ask that you support the community volunteers who are struggling but want to help,” said Judge Barker. “With calm deliberation we will allay the concerns and answer the questions asked regarding guardianship. Protecting those impacted by intellectual disabilities and diseases associated with aging is essential to the well-being of our families and community in Clark County. In cooperation with this commission, the judicial branch is actively addressing the guardianship issues raised and will pursue the best avenues and resources to develop solutions and improve the handling of guardianship cases.”

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Big Need Continues For CASA Volunteers To Advocate For 3,500 Children in Foster Care
 
Twenty new Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteers will be sworn in at a ceremony at the Eighth Judicial District Family Court on Friday, Feb. 13 at noon, at Family Court, Courtroom 9, 601 N. Pecos Road. The newly trained volunteers will help fill a very big need for advocates to speak on behalf of foster children in our community. Many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the nearly 3,500 children receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Last year, more than 900 children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, and deal with school challenges and home life. The goal is to get a volunteer to be a voice for every foster child.

“Children in foster care have already endured more than their share of difficult times. CASA volunteers can help ensure that these kids get proper care,” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan, who oversees the CASA program. “Volunteers are desperately needed. I urge members of the community to volunteer as a CASA. It is an incredibly rewarding experience.”
 
The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them. In 1980, Judge John Mendoza led the creation of the Clark County CASA Program. The CASA mission continues to be fully supported by Family Court judges.

For those interested in volunteering with CASA, monthly orientations are held on the third Wednesday of each month to provide more information about the program. Upcoming orientations will be held at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. For more information about the program please call 702-455-4306, visit http://www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas.

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A chorus of new Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteers were sworn in today at a ceremony at the Eighth Judicial District Family Court. The newly trained volunteers will help fill a very big need for advocates to speak on behalf of foster children in our community. Many more volunteers are needed to advocate for the nearly 3,500 children receiving services under supervision of Family Court. Last year, more than 900 children had a CASA volunteer to help them navigate through the system, and deal with school challenges and home life. The goal is to get a volunteer to be a voice for every foster child.

“Advocating for a foster child just a few hours each month, can make a very important difference in the life of a child,” said Family Court Judge Frank Sullivan, who oversees the CASA program. “I urge members of the community to consider volunteering for the CASA program. It will be a truly rewarding experience for those who volunteer.”

The CASA program recruits, screens, trains and supports volunteers to represent the best interests of hundreds of foster children annually. The advocates represent the children in school, child and family team meetings, and in court. Volunteering for the program involves a two-year commitment and a willingness to spend quality time with the children to advocate for them. In 1980, Judge John Mendoza led the creation of the Clark County CASA Program. The CASA mission continues to be fully supported by Family Court judges.

For those interested in volunteering with CASA, monthly orientations are held on the third Wednesday of each month to provide more information about the program. Upcoming orientations will be held at the Government Center, 500 S. Grand Central Pkwy. For more information about the program please call 702-455-4306, visit http://www.casalasvegas.org or Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/#!/CASALasVegas.

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Going to court can be a scary experience. Today, District Court Family Judge Cynthia Giuliani switched her robe with a fairy godmother suit to finalize adoptions for six families. Many of the children will came in costume to heighten the fun and help make it a day they will always remember.

This is the third year Judge Giuliani suited-up as a fairy godmother for adoptions around Halloween. “Court can be an intimidating experience, especially for children. We do this to make these adoptions fun instead of scary. Everybody can use a fairy godmother in their life to make things extra special,” said Judge Giuliani. “There’s a big need for adoptive families and this is also a fun way to get the word out so more children can get into permanent, stable homes with loving, caring families.” Family court is involved in other special adoption events, including an annual adoption day marathon which is scheduled this year for November 19. For more information about adoption, call the Clark County Department of Family Services at 702-455-7414.

“It’s great to see Family Court judges come up with creative ways raise awareness about the issue of getting children into permanent, stable, loving families,” said Family Division Presiding Judge Charles Hoskin. “There is a great need in Clark County to get good, caring families to step in to care for children in need.”

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Trial by Peers Graduation

Proud parents, family members and friend snapped photos as 30 students from Clark County ranging from ages 12 to 17 years old graduated from the Clark County Law Foundation’s Trial By Peers (TBP) Program Peer Counselor Summer Course. Judge Frank Sullivan was the master of ceremonies .

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