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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

Tag Archives: ClarkCountySchoolDistrict

 

Blue Diamond awards were presented to Truancy Diversion Program volunteer judges at a recognition event for those who are helping to keep Clark County students in school and on track to graduate. The volunteers work with the students weekly to help them transition from diamonds in the rough to brilliant young graduates.

Clark County reported over 240,000 truant children for school-year 2014-2015. Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the Clark County School District has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

The TDP was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002. Since 2007, the program has been overseen by District Court Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the CCSD.  Judges, attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers volunteer approximately three hours each week to and hold truancy court sessions at schools, where they meet individually with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to 80 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all Clark County schools have a TDP program.

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional or law enforcement officer and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program please contact DeDe Parker at: 702-321-2410.The Family Court youth programs are a great example of how the Eighth Judicial District Court is using alternative, efficient methods to address crime and ensure justice. District Court continuously works to develop innovative ideas, improve efficiencies, address issues and improve access to justice.

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Truancy Diversion Program (TDP) volunteers who commit to a school-year of weekly truancy diversion court sessions on a Clark County School District (CCSD) campus will be recognized on Friday, May 27 at 5:30 p.m. to be held at the Sam’s Town Hotel and Gambling Hall in the Ponderosa Ballroom at 5111 Boulder Hwy. Each of the volunteers will be given an award and the opportunity to share their experience with clearing the way for students to walk on graduation day.

The TDP was established by Judge Gerald Hardcastle in 2002. Since 2007, the program has been overseen by District Court Judge Jennifer Elliott in collaboration with the CCSD. “The volunteer Truancy Diversion Judges are playing an important role in addressing the significant issue of truancy in Clark County. They listen to the kids, hear their issues, encourage and motivate them. They clear a path for the students to graduate and have the opportunity for college or a career,” said Judge Elliott. “The attorneys and other professionals who volunteer as judges find it very rewarding to help these students get on track to graduate. I invite attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers to be part of the solution to the significant problem of truancy in our schools.”

Clark County reported over 240,000 truant children for school-year 2014-2015.Those without a high school diploma face higher prospects of unemployment and the associated negative consequences. This collaborative effort between the CCSD has been structured to prevent and reduce youth crime, re-engage students in learning, and ultimately, reduce potential costs to our welfare and justice systems. It is a non-punitive, incentive-based approach to at-risk school students with truancy problems. A team (judge, family advocate, school personnel) works with the students and their families.

Judges, attorneys, mental health professionals and law enforcement officers volunteer approximately three hours each week to and hold truancy court sessions at schools, where they meet individually with students and their parents. They review the students’ attendance, school work, and progress to ensure that students have the resources they need to be successful. The TDP judges promote and support academic achievement using a team effort and an individual student success plan. Since 2007, the TDP has expanded from six to 80 schools including elementary, middle schools and high schools. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court Family Division is to continue to expand until all Clark County schools have a TDP program.

“The Truancy Diversion volunteers, along with Judge Elliott and her team, have accomplished much to fill some of the gaps to get students struggling with attendance on track and in school,” said Presiding Family Court Judge Charles Hoskin. “Their efforts are making a difference in the lives of young people and improving their chances for success.”

If you are a licensed attorney, mental health professional or law enforcement officer and are interested in volunteering as a TDP judge for this Specialty Court program please contact DeDe Parker at: 702-321-2410.The Family Court youth programs are a great example of how the Eighth Judicial District Court is using alternative, efficient methods to address crime and ensure justice. District Court continuously works to develop innovative ideas, improve efficiencies, address issues and improve access to justice.

 

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Advanced Technologies Academy (A-TECH) seniors looked and acted the parts of lawyers, engineers and other professionals when they did their capstone project before District Court Judge Joanna Kishner on Apr. 20.

Students from the legal studies program served as the attorneys in the case, while students from the business management and administration, architectural drafting and design, and engineering programs served as expert witnesses and defendants. A-Tech’s community partners and school staff  served as jurors.

The mock case centered around what was intended to be a fun-filled train trip with a marriage proposal. But things turned bad for the couple John and Jennifer. Jennifer sued the train company for inadequate security, inadequate staff training, and inadequate evacuation procedures. Architects and designers were dragged into the suit which resulted in a challenging capstone project for the A-TECH seniors with majors in law, business management and administration, architectural drafting and design.

Check out the YouTube video https://youtu.be/CDZpjl-r4aw

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Senior students from the Advanced Technologies Academy (A-TECH) will do a mock trial before Eighth Judicial District Court Judge Joanna Kishner on Apr. 20 at 9 a.m. at the Eighth Judicial District Court, in the Regional Justice Center, Courtroom 12B. The case that centers around a party train trip gone bad for a young couple, is the senior class capstone project and they will be judged on how much they learned this year.

Students from the legal studies program will serve as the attorneys in the case, while students from the business management and administration, architectural drafting and design, and engineering programs will serve as expert witnesses and defendants. A-TECH’s community partners and school staff will act as members of the jury. Advanced Technologies Academy advisory board members will help facilitate the mock trial and participate as jurors.

“This capstone project gives Clark County students real-world knowledge of a courtroom. It’s conducted in a manner similar to a real trial and offers the kind of experience students at law schools get. I’ve presided over these mock trials for three years; each year, I am impressed with the level of professionalism the A-TECH students demonstrate,” said Judge Kishner. “The work they put in and their presentations are a credit to the students and the teachers.”

The mock case centers around what was intended to be a fun-filled train trip with a marriage proposal. But things turn bad for the couple John and Jennifer. Jennifer sues the train company for inadequate security, inadequate staff training, and inadequate evacuation procedures. Architects and designers get dragged into the suit which results in a challenging capstone project for the A-TECH seniors with majors in law, business management and administration, architectural drafting and design.

Assisting with mock trials is one of many youth educational opportunities the District Court offers. The goal of the Eighth Judicial District Court is to continue to reach out, inform and serve the community as a partner and ensure access to justice. For more information about the Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court, please visit our website at clarkcountycourts.us, Facebook at Clark County Courts, or Twitter at M Price@LasVegasCourts..

 

 

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Nothin’ but the Grover Clevelands!

Miranda is 50 and high school sophomores, juniors and seniors can enter to win $2,000 with a video or essay for the 2016 Ninth Circuit Civics Contest.

We all know the opening lines: “You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law.” But what do they mean? The Ninth Circuit Courts and Community Committee and the federal courts of the western United States are looking for the answer from high school sophomores, juniors and seniors in the form of an essay or video. The top three entries can win cash prizes; with first place taking home $2,000; second place $1,000 and third $500.Complete contest details can be found at http://www.ca9.uscourts.gov/civicscontest/. The deadline is fast approaching: April 15 at 5 p.m.

Below is a summary of information from the site:

The theme of the contest is the United States Supreme Court’s landmark 1966 decision in Miranda v. Arizona. The court ruled that someone taken into police custody must be informed – prior to questioning – of their Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. The decision became the basis for what is now referred to as a “Miranda Warning” or a recitation of “Miranda Rights.”

The contest has two components: 1) Individual students can express their thoughts and ideas in an essay of 500 to 750 words, and 2) Individual students or teams of up to three students may submit a 2-3 minute video presentation on the theme. Students may participate in one or both competitions.

The U.S. District Court for the District of Nevada is hosting a local contest with winners moving on to the Ninth Circuit competition.  Project REAL, a non-profit group focused on teaching young people about the law, will be assisting the court in this civics education effort.  The contest is open to high school students throughout the State of Nevada. For more information about the district contest, student can contact Paige Brown (775) 686-5605 paige_brown@nvd.uscourts.gov. Come on Nevada students, make our state proud.

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Judge Timothy Williams took lawyers to school to give Canyon Spring High School students an education on a real short trial. The judge used a civil short trial as a teaching tool for students in the high school law magnet program. “A short trial provides the perfect educational experience for students, because it takes all the elements of a complex trial and distills it down to one day,” said Judge Williams. “The opportunity to show students the legal process and give them first-hand experience is a wonderful teaching tool for the District Court and the Clark County School District.”

Short trials are used to resolve civil cases in one day. In a short trial, each party is limited to three hours to present their case and the jury is composed of four or six members rather than eight. Short trials have proven to be a cost effective way to resolve many civil cases that may be less complicated or lower in dollar value than others.

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The Truancy Diversion Project (TDP) volunteers who keep kids in school got high marks and praise for their work. The purpose of the TDP is to be an effective tool assisting the Clark County School District to reduce absenteeism and the dropout rate and thereby reducing the number of students entering the formal juvenile justice court system. To volunteer e-mail drose@clarkcountycourts.us.

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