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eighthjdcourt

Info about the Eighth Judicial District Court.

When you walk into a specialty court graduation ceremony you know you’re entering something really special. There is excitement and optimism in the air. Families and friends are present with balloons, flowers and cake to support their loved ones. The monthly District Court graduations in the jury services room mark a point of change. Hearing Master Melissa De La Garza reminds participants to savor the moment and remember how they feel as they graduate. The grads will need that thought and that feeling to carry them through the tough times and help them to maintain their commitment to be substance-abuse free.

Hearing Master Melissa De La Garza https://youtu.be/IjM_Mdawo44

Deputy Public Defender Christy Craig https://youtu.be/jf94O1_qMt8

Each month, nearly 30 participants graduate from intensive specialty court treatment programs. Eighty-nine participants graduated from the District specialty courts programs in the past three months. Multiply that times all the people in their families and you can get a sense of the kind of impact that the programs are having on the community. That’s 89 families who have a loved one who is contributing instead of disrupting their lives. The community as whole will also benefit from this wave of people committed to a better life. At an estimated jail cost of $135 per-day per-inmate, 89 successful graduates saves $12,015 a night and more than $4.3  million a year in incarceration costs alone. The social benefits are immeasurable. The graduating class includes participants from veterans court, mental health court, the OPEN program, drug court and felony DUI court.

Kicking addiction and giving up the life that goes with it isn’t easy. “I know you worked really hard to get to this point it is just the beginning though and there is a lot of work to do in the future. It is a great time to celebrate the accomplishments you have achieved so far,” said Judge Linda Bell, who presides over specialty courts. “We really look forward seeing all the things that you do as you move on from specialty courts.”

Judge Linda Marie Bell at specialty court graduation https://youtu.be/LI45EnZ-mR4

Specialty courts take a rigorous and coordinated approach between judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, Parole and Probation, law enforcement and mental health/social service/treatment professionals to make the transition possible. All work together to help participants recover, live crime-free and become productive citizens and it’s worth it. Treating addiction and related disorders has proven to be a much more effective way to address crime surround substance abuse rather than let low-level offenders revolve through the prison system.

“It’s not the end of the road for your sobriety. It’s a lifetime of sobriety,” said Jude Carolyn Ellsworth, who presides over drug court. “Now you have the tools and you know how to handle things when time get rough.”

Judge Carolyn Ellsworth https://youtu.be/oKy9-BQGxFU

Jarenie Trachier Quilts of Valor non-profit organization

https://youtu.be/ieSH3VlX4IQ

Deputy Public Defender Christy Craig https://youtu.be/jf94O1_qMt8

 

Judge Linda Marie Bell at specialty court graduation

https://youtu.be/LI45EnZ-mR4

Judge Carolyn Ellsworth

https://youtu.be/oKy9-BQGxFU

Hearing Master Melissa De La Garza

https://youtu.be/IjM_Mdawo44

Deputy Public Defender Christy Craig

https://youtu.be/jf94O1_qMt8

Jarenie Trachier Quilts of Valor non-profit organization

https://youtu.be/ieSH3VlX4IQ

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Don’t miss the Joint Guardianship/Probate/Trust/Elder Law Bench Bar Meeting Monday, June 25, from noon to 1 p.m., in courtroom 10D at the Regional Justice Center. Attorneys who attend the session will get one Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit. A legislative report will cover proposed guardianship rules and forms.

Those who attend should bring a printout of this packet JointBenchBarPacket6_18

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Chief Judge Elizabeth Gonzalez issued two administrative orders that outline changes to both the civil and criminal dockets in the Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court.

NV Eighth Judicial District Court Administrative Order 10-04 AO 18-04

NV Eighth Judicial District Court Administrative Order 10-05 AO 18-05

The following courtroom/chamber moves will also take place from June 29 through

July 1:

Department 11 (Judge Elizabeth Gonzalez) will move from courtroom 10 to 3E.

Department 19 (Judge William Kephart) will move from  courtroom 3E to 16B.

Department 4 (Judge Kerry Earley) will move from courtroom 16B to 12D.

Department 16 (Judge Timothy C. Williams) will move from courtroom 12 D to 3H.

Department 15 (Judge Joe Hardy) will move from courtroom 3H to 11D.

Department 2 (Judge Richard Scotti) will move from courtroom 11D to 3B.

Department 29 (Judge David M. Jones) will move from  courtroom 3B to 15A.

Department 7 (Judge Linda Marie Bell) will move from courtroom 15A to 10.

Effective July 1, Judge Linda Marie Bell will assume the responsibilities of chief judge for the Nevada Eighth Judicial District Court. “I know that moving is disruptive; I appreciate everyone’s patience with the process,” said Judge Bell. “The moves will allow the business court judges to remain on the same floor, which has been very beneficial to the business court litigants and judges. This will also ensure that all judges handling criminal cases have Sally-port access.”  Those who have questions or concerns regarding the moves are encourage to contact Judge Bell’s office.

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This is a complete list of courtrooms with the new assignments: CourtroomAssignments6_20_18

 

 

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Judge Jennifer Togliatti Tuesday signed the Order of Execution for Scott Dozier. She also issued a Warrant of Execution.

ScottDozierWarrant ofEx

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Scammers have upped their game in yet another round of attempts to rip-off residents of Clark County, using the courts as bait. The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department today, notified the court of a new round of rip-offs aimed at unsuspecting individuals who are targeted with a false claim of an arrest warrant for failure to appear on a Grand Jury summons.

According to correspondence from the LVMPD Financial Crimes Bureau, the scammers recently targeted a physician who was threatened with arrest for failure to appear on a Federal Grand Jury summons.

“The public should know that the court never calls on the phone or emails to solicit money or personal information under the threat of arrest for missing jury duty,” said District Court Chief Judge Elizabeth Gonzalez. “These scams are very sophisticated and persistent problem. We want to make the public aware of them and ask that those who get this this warning pass it along to friends and family so that they don’t fall victim.”

Different variations of this and other similar scams regularly surface in our community. Senior citizens are a favorite target of the scammers. A very official sounding scam artist usually calls unwitting victims and claims to have a warrant for their arrest for skipping jury duty. They offer up a few details that appear to check out through a cursory Internet search, such as the name of a judge or other official. Then the criminals get the victims to purchase a pre-paid credit card for hundreds of dollars to clear the warrant they claim they have. Within minutes, the scammers cash in on the cards and rip-off the worried victims.  These scams also come in the form of an official looking email.

Don’t fall for these rip-offs and be aware that the court never calls on the phone to solicit money or personal information. Report the crime to law enforcement and spread the word to friends and family.

Top three point to know about these scams

  1. The court never calls or e-mails people to get personal information such as their social security number. Those who receive these e-mails or call should not respond and are advised to contact the Attorney General’s office or the LVMPD Financial Crimes Theft Crimes Bureau.
  2. A key red-flag is the request for money or a pre-paid credit card. No official representatives of the court will call to solicit money for any purpose.
  3. Be wary of phone calls or emails that look like a jury summons and request important personal information including: date of birth, social security number, driver’s license number; and threatens a fine or prison for failing to respond.

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eighthjdcourt

Six Eighth Judicial District Court employees were honored by the bench for going above and beyond in their work to keep things running effectively and efficiently at the court. Those honored include Tatyana Ristic who was named District Court Judicial Employee of the Year; Mark Vobis, named Deputy Marshal of the Year; Brian Hernandez, named District Court Judicial Marshal of the Year; Ronald Ramsey, named Judicial Marshal of the Year; Erica Page, named District Court Administrative Employee of the Year and Karen Christensen, named Clerk of the Court Employee of the Year. The ceremony was held at an all-judges meeting on June 13.

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Six Eighth Judicial District Court employees were honored by the bench for going above and beyond in their work to keep things running effectively and efficiently at the court. Those honored include Tatyana Ristic who was named District Court Judicial Employee of the Year; Mark Vobis, named Deputy Marshal of the Year; Brian Hernandez, named District Court Judicial Marshal of the Year; Ronald Ramsey, named Judicial Marshal of the Year; Erica Page, named District Court Administrative Employee of the Year and Karen Christensen, named Clerk of the Court Employee of the Year. The ceremony was held at an all-judges meeting on June 13.

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